Turning Points: Stories of Change Premieres

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Four Community Stories to Become Short Films

Turning Points: Stories of ChangeKHC is partnering with four Kansas community organizations to produce a series of 5-minute Turning Points short films. Each short film will explore a pivotal moment in the history of a community. The project is supported by a generous grant from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

The four Turning Points short film projects are:

“The Art of Change”
Hays Public Library

The idea for the Hays Arts Council was born nearly 50 years ago over a cup of coffee. Since then, the arts and humanities have been incorporated into the civic life of Hays, providing the abundant power of culture in community collaboration and civic engagement. Luci Bain, project director.

“Navigating Rough Waters”
Kinsley Library

Kinsley repeatedly faced evacuation, damage, and stagnated development because of high water from the Arkansas River and two creeks. To solve the problem, Kinsley’s leaders found themselves navigating citizens who would come together during a disaster, but were divided when it came for finding solutions. Joan Weaver, project director.

“New Hope in the Heartland”
The Seed House — Casa de la Semilla, Wichita & Ulysses

As many rural communities struggle with the negative effects of depopulation, immigrants from Latin American and Southeast Asia are sparking a renaissance of entrepreneurs and renewed cultural vitality in Ulysses. Armando Minjarez, project director.

“Signs for a Culture”
Deaf Cultural Center, Olathe

When a new highway sign directed travelers to the Kansas School for the Deaf, it brought parents and students, but also curious travelers, researchers, and others interested in learning more about Deaf culture. The need for community outreach led to the establishment of the Deaf Cultural Center to educate the general public about the various types of hearing loss and to preserve and share the rich heritage of this community. Julie Theel and Sandra Kelly, project directors.

Public film premieres and discussions will be held at the conclusion of the project. Follow KHC on Facebook and Twitter for updates.

Turning Points: Community

 

KHC’s special initiative, Turning Points: Stories of Change, invites museums, public libraries, and other nonprofit cultural and civic groups to tell their community’s pivotal moment in history as a five-minute short film. The project is supported by a generous gift from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

What is a Turning Point? Think of it as an idea, event, action, or moment in time that directly or indirectly caused decisive change in your community. This change can be social, cultural, or economic, but it ultimately, and significantly, affected your community’s way of thinking or doing.

Here are some topics and videos to use as inspiration for your Turning Points application. Note: inclusion of video or articles in this post is not an endorsement.

Community

All Turning Points: Stories of Change projects relate to community, but this topic category looks at turning points that impact the community fabric and way of life. Turning points can take communities in new directions, reconnect residents with the past in new ways, and help citizens chart a course for the future. Ideas for Community Turning Points include:

Uniting & Rebuilding

When disaster strikes, many communities come together to unite and rebuild. While a disaster in and of itself is a turning point, it can also be a catalyst for community change for the positive: community teamwork, new partnerships, new construction, and a change in perspective. How has your community’s response to a disaster been a positive turning point for your community?

Ideas to consider:

Read about a Wisconsin community’s rebuilding efforts after a devastating flood. [Baraboo News Republic]

Heritage & Culture

Preserving the Past: Topeka’s Jayhawk Theatre (FLIKS Version) from WonderCat Productions on Vimeo.

Many communities find that investing in heritage and culture is an important turning point for their community. Restoration of an historic building or districts, establishment of historical museums or arts centers, or other investments that promote engagement with history and culture can create positive ripple effects in a community. Has a heritage or cultural project been a turning point for your community?

Ideas to consider:

Watch a story about a North Carolina community’s historic preservation success story. [UNC TV]

New Beginnings

A monumental event can completely change the course of a community and send it in a new direction. The most famous example in Kansas is the 2007 tornado in Greensburg and the town’s new life as a green, sustainable community. But, it’s not just tornados, floods, or fires that prompt new beginnings. What turning points have sent your community on a new path or created a new vision for the future?

Ideas to consider:

Watch a story about Greensburg’s use of green standards to rebuild after the 2007 tornado. [USA Today]

It’s Local!

A renewed interest in slow food and support of local agriculture has impacted the way communities grow, purchase, and eat their food. Farmers markets, food hubs, community gardens, farm tours, and urban farms bring people together and impact local farms, businesses, community health, and tourism. Has your community experienced a turning point related to community agriculture?

Ideas to consider:

Read about food hubs in Iowa. [Iowa Public Radio]

Watch a story about the urban farming movement. [New York Times]

The deadline for Turning Points: Stories of Change applications is July 31, 2013. Click here for application and eligibility requirements. Contact Leslie Von Holten, program officer, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359 for more information.

Turning Points: Business

KHC’s special initiative, Turning Points: Stories of Change, invites museums, public libraries, and other nonprofit cultural and civic groups to tell their community’s pivotal moment in history as a five-minute short film. The project is supported by a generous gift from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

What is a Turning Point? Think of it as an idea, event, action, or moment in time that directly or indirectly caused decisive change in your community. This change can be social, cultural, or economic, but it ultimately, and significantly, affected your community’s way of thinking or doing.

Here are some topics and videos to use as inspiration for your Turning Points application. Note: inclusion of video or articles in this post is not an endorsement.

Business

Businesses shape and energize our communities. Whether it’s a new business venture or a community’s response to the loss of a factory or grocery store, businesses drive many of our community turning points.

Saving Local Businesses

Across America, small towns and urban neighborhoods have developed innovative ways to deal with the loss of community grocery stores, movie theaters, and other vital businesses. Is your town or neighborhood one of them? How has your community’s response to the loss of a local business been a turning point?
Video via America’s Heartland.

Ideas to consider:

Read about the impact of a new grocery store in Kansas City neighborhood. [Kansas City Business Journal]

Entrepreneurs

Has an entrepreneur put your community on the map? Whether it’s a shop, factory, restaurant, or technology firm, a local entrepreneur’s success story can be a community turning point.

Ideas to consider:

Read the story of a quilter whose Missouri shop has a global following. [Kansas City Star]

Read about high-end furniture manufacturers, Dessin Fournir Companies of Plainville, KS. [Get Rural Kansas]

Listen as Ron Wilson shares stories of Kansas entrepreneurs on Kansas Profile. [Kansas Profile/K-State]

Giving Back

Local businesses give back their communities in numerous and innovative ways. Whether it’s supporting a local food bank, donating funds to a local institution, or volunteering, the example set by local businesses inspires others to follow their lead. Has a local business’s spirit of giving been a turning point for your community?
Video via CNS Maryland.

Ideas to consider:

Read about Excel Industries and their legacy of giving in Hesston. [Hesston College]

The deadline for Turning Points: Stories of Change applications is July 31, 2013. Click here for application and eligibility requirements. Contact Leslie Von Holten, program officer, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359 for more information.

Turning Points: Technology

KHC’s special initiative, Turning Points: Stories of Change, invites museums, public libraries, and other nonprofit cultural and civic groups to tell their community’s pivotal moment in history as a five-minute short film. The project is supported by a generous gift from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

What is a Turning Point? Think of it as an idea, event, action, or moment in time that directly or indirectly caused decisive change in your community. This change can be social, cultural, or economic, but it ultimately, and significantly, affected your community’s way of thinking or doing.

Here are some topics and videos to use as inspiration for your Turning Points application. Note: inclusion of video or articles in this post is not an endorsement.

Technology

From the computers at our homes and businesses to the smart phones in our pockets to the ATMs at the local bank or supermarket, technology impacts every facet of our lives. Technology marks a definite turning point between “before” and “after,” but technology can also impact a community through job opportunities, access to the wider world, and by changing the ways we live and work. Ideas for Technology Turning Points include:

 

Access

Much of modern life is lived online and computers, smart phones, and iPads are our gateway to the online world. Technology — and access to technology — can be a turning point for communities. Has increased access to technology, through faster internet speed or computers at the library, been a turning point for your community?
Video via NBC News.

Ideas to consider:

Read about how one-third of Americans use public library computers, according to a study from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [NBC News]

Work on the Farm & in the City

Whether you live and work in a rural area, the suburbs, or a city, technology plays a big role in your life. For farmers, technology has changed the way farmers do their job. In cities, access to high speed internet has attracted technology startups. How has technology been a turning point for your community’s workers?

Ideas to consider:

Listen to a podcast about technology innovations and farming in Goodland. [High Plains Museum]

Read about the startups springing up in the Kansas City area because of Google Fiber. [Huffington Post]

Entrepreneurs

Technology innovators can be found in cities, small towns, and rural areas. Their success can be a turning point for a community economically and socially. Has a technology entrepreneur’s business success been a turning point for your community? Has an entrepreneur’s innovations created a technology turning point for your community?

Ideas to consider:

Read about a technology entrepreneur with roots in rural Iowa. [Silicon Prairie News]

The deadline for Turning Points: Stories of Change applications is July 31, 2013. Click here for application and eligibility requirements. Contact Leslie Von Holten, program officer, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359 for more information.

Turning Points: People

 

KHC’s special initiative, Turning Points: Stories of Change, invites museums, public libraries, and other nonprofit cultural and civic groups to tell their community’s pivotal moment in history as a five-minute short film. The project is supported by a generous gift from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

What is a Turning Point? Think of it as an idea, event, action, or moment in time that directly or indirectly caused decisive change in your community. This change can be social, cultural, or economic, but it ultimately, and significantly, affected your community’s way of thinking or doing.

Here are some topics and videos to use as inspiration for your Turning Points application. Note: inclusion of video or articles in this post is not an endorsement.

People

Turning points need people. It’s as simple as that. Community visionaries, groundbreakers, and volunteers make change happen. Who are the agents of change who have brought about Turning Points in your community? Some ideas about Turning Points and People include:

Groundbreakers

 

Every community has it’s “firsts”: the first female city council member, the first doctor, the first integrated students, and the list goes on. For many communities, these groundbreakers bring new ideas and serve as catalysts for change in a community. How has a community groundbreaker influenced a turning point in your community?
Video via KSHB.

Other ideas to consider:

Watch the Mariachi Estrella short film about the first all-female mariachi band.

Visionaries

These are the civic leaders, the town boosters, educators, library directors, museum professionals, and business people who make things happen in our community. They see what our community could be and work to make that happen. How have your community visionaries brought about a turning point in your community?

Other ideas to consider:

Watch the Bauer, Baker, and Baldwin City short film about one man’s vision for electrifying a small town.

Watch Uncommon Ground, a short film about one woman’s vision to revive the Bartlett Arboretum in Belle Plaine.

Kan-Doers

They are the people in your community who are always there to help. They are the ones who organize community events, care for the sick, man the volunteer fire department, and keep the community spirit alive. Has a volunteer force in your community been responsible for a turning point?

Read about volunteers whose work is keeping small town theaters alive. [New York Times]

Listen to a podcast about the Goodfellows, a volunteer group in Rice County. [Coronado-Quivira Museum]

Read about volunteers who worked to restore a cemetery in Iowa. [Daily Yonder]

The deadline for Turning Points: Stories of Change applications is July 31, 2013. Click here for application and eligibility requirements. Contact Leslie Von Holten, program officer, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359 for more information.

Turning Points: Tourism

KHC’s special initiative, Turning Points: Stories of Change, invites museums, public libraries, and other nonprofit cultural and civic groups to tell their community’s pivotal moment in history as a five-minute short film. The project is supported by a generous gift from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

What is a Turning Point? Think of it as an idea, event, action, or moment in time that directly or indirectly caused decisive change in your community. This change can be social, cultural, or economic, but it ultimately, and significantly, affected your community’s way of thinking or doing.

Here are some topics and videos to use as inspiration for your Turning Points application. Note: inclusion of video or articles in this post is not an endorsement.

Tourism

Landmarks, festivals, museums, and one-of-a-kind attractions bring tourists to our communities from near and far. Think of a Tourism Turning Points short film in terms of how tourism transformed your community, rather than a film promoting tourism in your community. Some ideas for Tourism Turning Points include:

Festivals & Celebrations

Community festivals connect us to community heritage and unite us around a common culture, local custom, or point of community pride. Has your community’s festival become a source of tourism? Has it united your community? How has a community festival or celebration become a turning point?

Listen to Ron Wilson’s story of Paxico’s Meatloaf Festival. [Kansas Profile/K-State]

Watch a story about Topeka’s Fiesta Mexicana, now in it’s 80th year.[WIBW]

Watch highlights from the 2011 Czech Fest in Wilson. [scottosonic/YouTube]

Watch a story about the colorful Coal Buckets in downtown Pittsburg, part of the Southeast Kansas Arts Fest. [Fourstates]

Off the Beaten Path

Roadside attractions are unique and memorable monuments to creativity and ingenuity. A roadside attraction’s popularity can be a turning point for a community, bringing more tourists and revitalizing downtowns. Has a roadside attraction been a turning point for your community?
Video via World’s Largest Things.

Other ideas to consider:

Click here to read about Cawker City’s Ball of Twine. [Roadside America]

Working Together

Region by region and across the state, communities have worked together to promote one another. Has your community experienced revitalization or increased tourism because of cooperative marketing?
Video: 8 Wonders of Kansas Guidebook reception, via Kansas Sampler.

Other ideas to consider:

Watch the “A Drive Through History along the Post Rock Scenic Byway” short film.

The deadline for Turning Points: Stories of Change applications is July 31, 2013. Click here for application and eligibility requirements. Contact Leslie Von Holten, program officer, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359 for more information.

Turning Points: Population

KHC’s special initiative, Turning Points: Stories of Change, invites museums, public libraries, and other nonprofit cultural and civic groups to tell their community’s pivotal moment in history as a five-minute short film. The project is supported by a generous gift from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

What is a Turning Point? Think of it as an idea, event, action, or moment in time that directly or indirectly caused decisive change in your community. This change can be social, cultural, or economic, but it ultimately, and significantly, affected your community’s way of thinking or doing.

Here are some topics and videos to use as inspiration for your Turning Points application. Note: inclusion of video or articles in this post is not an endorsement.

Population

Aging populations, new residents, and introduction of new cultures are population turning points for many communities. Is your community one of them? Ideas for Population Turning Points include:

Aging Populations

As we live longer, our communities change and adapt to meet the needs of an aging population. In rural communities, this could mean public transportation changes, new businesses and services, or an effort to recruit young residents to carry on traditions and leadership. Some communities have been singled out as good places to retire, bringing changes in housing and recreation, as well as opportunities for citizens of all ages. How has your community’s aging population been a turning point?
Video via Schowalter Villa, Hesston.

More ideas to consider:

Click here for a series about aging farmers in rural communities. [Harvest Public Media]

Click here for the story of the aging population in one Iowa community [CNN Radio].

Click here to learn how Lawrence, Manhattan, and Olathe have become retirement destinations. [Topeka Capital-Journal]

New Populations

Whether it’s a business opening that draws workers and their families, opportunities that attract young people, or an influx of new immigrants from around the world, new populations are a turning point for communities. New residents enrich our communities, bring new ideas and entrepreneurship, and broaden our cultural horizons. Has a new population saved your community from the brink of decline? How have new residents marked a turning point in your community?

Other ideas to consider:

Click here for an article about how the influx of Hispanic populations marked a turning point for rural Kansas communities. [New York Times]

Listen to the story of a young couple who left behind the amenities of urban life for small town life in Goodland.

The deadline for Turning Points: Stories of Change applications is July 31, 2013. Click here for application and eligibility requirements. Contact Leslie Von Holten, program officer, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359 for more information.

 

Turning Points: Transportation

KHC’s special initiative, Turning Points: Stories of Change, invites museums, public libraries, and other nonprofit cultural and civic groups to tell their community’s pivotal moment in history as a five-minute short film. The project is supported by a generous gift from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

What is a Turning Point? Think of it as an idea, event, action, or moment in time that directly or indirectly caused decisive change in your community. This change can be social, cultural, or economic, but it ultimately, and significantly, affected your community’s way of thinking or doing.

Here are some topics and videos to use as inspiration for your Turning Points application. Note: inclusion of video or articles in this post is not an endorsement.

Transportation

Transportation changes the way residents of a community live, work, and play. It impacts who comes and goes, as well as how we get from Point A to Point B. Transportation also impacts how communities grow and develop. Some ideas for Transportation Turning Points include:

Interstate Highway System

The Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 created a network of easily navigable highways connecting cities and small towns across America. Did the interstate highway system change your community? Did it solve some of the problems addressed in the 1954 film? How did highways and interstates become a turning point in your community’s work and home life?

Public Transportion

Does your community have an interesting public transportation option? Some communities whose residents face long drives for trips to the doctor and grocery store have come up with fresh new ideas. Is your community one of them? In larger cities, bus lines move workers, students, and families across town. What is the turning point that made your community mobile?

Ideas to consider:

Read about a car sharing program in Lawrence. [Lawrence Journal-World]

A New Life for Old Railroads

Many communities have revitalized old railroad tracks and depots for new uses that unite community and bring tourism and economic benefits: parks, bike trails, short track railroad attractions, community centers, or museums. Has your community found an innovative new use for old railroads that has brought positive change to your community?

Click here to watch a video about a community railroad revitalization project in Chicago.

The deadline for Turning Points: Stories of Change applications is July 31, 2013. Click here for application and eligibility requirements. Contact Leslie Von Holten, program officer, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359 for more information.

Partners Wanted for Short Film Project

Turning Points: Stories of ChangeDeadline: July 31, 2013.
Click here for the application and eligibility requirements.

KHC invites museums, historical societies, public libraries, and other nonprofit cultural and civic organizations to apply for a special short film initiative, Turning Points: Stories of Change. KHC will partner with four organizations to develop 5-minute short films that explore a significant moment of change in each of their communities. This project is supported by a generous gift from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

What is a Turning Point? Think of it as an idea, event, action, or moment in time that directly caused decisive change in your community. This change can be social, cultural, or economic, but it ultimately and significantly affected your community’s way of thinking or doing. Need inspiration? Click here for Turning Points project ideas.

Watch this short film to learn more:

Turning Points Promo from Gizmo Pictures on Vimeo.

Contact Leslie Von Holten, program officer, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359 for more information.