Humanities Happenings: 08/14-08/16

Perry's school mascot, the Kaw. Photo courtesy of Perry Pride.

Perry Rural High School’s mascot, the Kaw, c.1920s. Photo courtesy of Perry Pride.

Perry, Wamego, Colby, and four other Kansas communities are ready to help you savor the final weeks of summer!

Cottonwood Falls: Baseball and the Big Picture
John Dreifort, professor of History at Wichita State University, explores baseball’s influences outside the field of play as well as the effect of external factors on the game. Learn about key issues such as demographics, communities, social mobility, race and ethnicity, baseball as a business, player-management relations, amateurs, gender, and international play. This event supports “Chase County: A League of Our Own,” a partner site exhibit that explores the baseball tradition in Chase County. The project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. August 15th at Chase County Historical Society at 1:00pm. Click here for details.

Wichita: Ghost Towns
Kansas has nearly 9000 disappeared towns and communities, caused by its unusual and spectacularly fast settlement history. The variety of town types–from colony and end-of-line towns to cumulative and rural communities–is as striking as the stories they left behind. Kansas towns are diverse and contain vital human histories of failure and persistence against the odds. M.J. Morgan, Speakers Bureau, will explore research conducted on lost Kansas places and discuss problems of recovery of information. August 15th at Alford Branch, Wichita Public Library at 1:00pm. Click here for details.

McPherson: Sainted Stadiums
Kansans place a high level of importance on their athletic architecture. From Allen Fieldhouse in Lawrence to the Hornet’s Nest in Dighton, Hubbard Stadium in Smith Center to Veteran’s Stadium in Coffeyville, we cheer for our teams in a variety of buildings that commemorate fallen soldiers, lift the spirits of communities, and entertain us with the newest technologies. Jordan Poland, Speakers Bureau, will explore Kansas sports venues through time, as well as the stories of the athletes and fans who have called these places home. Join us as we walk through a timeline of athletic architecture in Kansas, across the spectrum of sports, to illustrate how these places have affected our collective memory and have been the gathering point for generations of fans. August 15th at McPherson Museum & Arts Foundation at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

Colby: Preservation Workshop
This public preservation workshop will be led by Cynthia Harris, Archivist at Kansas State University’s Hale Library. The preservation workshop is aimed at helping veterans and their families preserve material related to military service. This event is part of “The Things They Carried Home” grants initiative, and supports “World War II Veterans Memorial Highway: A Tour of Remembrance, A Corridor of Service,” a project sponsored by Solomon Valley–Hwy 24–Heritage Alliance.  August 15th at Prairie Museum of Art and History at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

Wamego: “Backyard Brawl and BBQ”
This “Hometown Teams” partner site photo exhibition documents the “Backyard Brawl,” a pre-season football tradition that unites the rival communities of Wamego and Westmoreland. Exhibition on display through September 27th. August 15th at Wamego Public Library. Click here for details.

Perry: “Hometown Teams” Exhibition Opening
Experience the story of sports — the athletes, the coaches, and the fans who cheer them on — in “Hometown Teams,” a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition. Get up close to memorable artifacts and view over 200 photographs highlighting Americans and their love of sports. Get into the game with “Minute for Movement” sports-inspired exercise stations designed to get you moving. Perry Pride’s companion exhibition “Together We Are Stronger: The Evolution of Sports Along the Kaw” will also be on display. Exhibitions on display through September 27th. August 15th at Historic Perry Rural High School Gym at Highland Community College, Perry Center. Click here for details.

Topeka: Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe
Fannie Flagg’s endearing novel travels from the 1980s back to the 1930s, when Idgie and Ruth’s Alabama cafe offered good barbecue, love, laughter, and even an occasional murder. 395 pp. Anne Hawkins leads the TALK book discussion from the TALK series, Community: The Way We Live. August 16th at Aldersgate Village at 3:00pm. Click here for details.

Wichita: Early Voting
Kansas women gained the vote in 1912, eight years before Congress passed the 19th Amendment, granting voting rights to all American women. To accomplish this feat, Kansas women had to overcome many obstacles, including the indifference of their own sex and the fear many had of being considered “unladylike.” Diane Eickhoff, Speakers Bureau, revisits the women’s suffrage campaigns of 1859, 1867, 1894, and 1912. Presentation sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Wichita. August 16th at Wichita-Sedgwick County Historical Museum at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

For upcoming KHC-supported events in August and beyond, visit our calendar.

Humanities Happenings: 06/26-06/28

Photo courtesy of Meredith Wiggins

Lincoln School, Atchison. Photo courtesy of Meredith Wiggins.

Put on your game face and get ready for a Saturday jam-packed with KHC-supported events in Atchison, Clay Center, Blue Rapids, and more.

Great Bend: Angels in the Outfield (1994)
When a boy prays for a chance to have a family if the California Angels win the pennant, angels are assigned to make that possible. This film screening supports “Argonne Rebels Drum & Bugle Corps,” a special partner site exhibit that tells the story of a competitive drum and bugle corps established in Great Bend in the 1940s. The project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. June 26th at Great Bend Public Library at 3:00pm. Click here for details.

Atchison: “Hometown Teams” Exhibition Opening
Experience the story of sports–the athletes, the coaches, and the fans who cheer them on–in “Hometown Teams,” a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition. Get up close to memorable artifacts and view over 200 photographs highlighting Americans and their love of sports. Get into the game with “Minute for Movement” sports-inspired exercise stations designed to get you moving.

Also on display is the Atchison County Historical Society’s companion exhibition, “Team Colors: Wearing Our Hearts on Our Sleeves, Caps and Coats.” June 27th at Atchison County Historical Society. Click here for details.

Blue Rapids: “For a Day, for a Decade, for a Century”
The public is invited to the opening of “For a Day, for a Decade, for a Century,” a special partner site exhibit that features a 1913 exhibition baseball game between the Chicago White Sox and the New York Giants played in Blue Rapids.

This project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. June 27th at Blue Rapids Historical Society at 9:00am. Click here for details.

Alma: Flint Hills Photographer
Hear a panel of experts discuss the life of Otto Kratzer, a Volland business owner and amateur photographer whose work captured life in the Flint Hills community between 1905 and 1965. Learn the significance of Kratzer’s photo and film collection and hear about the lifecycle of the now-vanished town of Volland. Panel is moderated by Virgil Dean, Adjunct History Professor at Washburn University, and sponsored by Wabaunsee County Historical Society. June 27th at the Volland Store at 1:00pm. Click here for details.

Hiawatha: Preservation Workshop
This public preservation workshop will be led by Shannon Hsu, Curator of Collections at Shawnee Town 1929. The preservation workshop is aimed at helping veterans and their families preserve material related to military service. The workshop is part of “The Things They Carried Home” grants initiative, and is sponsored by Brown County Historical Society. June 27th at Morrill Public Library at 10:00am. Click here for details.

Marysville: Movement through Music
Kansas City jazz thrived on diversity: just as it melded and reshaped African and European musical traditions, it also gained energy and vitality from the talents of musicians of all races. KC’s jazz visionaries crossed social barriers and championed racial integration. Kevin Rabas, Speakers Bureau, explores how musicians such as Charlie Parker, Coleman Hawkins, and Lester Young drew national attention to the need for racial harmony by integrating KC’s black musicians union, touring with integrated bands, and writing songs that advocated equal rights in the early years of the Civil Rights movement. June 27th at Marysville Public Library at 1:00pm. Click here for details.

Concordia: “Eye Deep in Hell”
Soldiers in the trenches of World War I suffered extreme temperatures, disease, and parasites in addition to the psychological stresses of war. Larry Burke, Speakers Bureau, explores events leading to the outbreak of war, and will examine the strategies and tactics of trench warfare with special emphasis on the individuals who fought the war along the Western Front. How did the soldiers cope with the immense stress of the trenches? How did they find the courage to go “over the top” into the maelstrom of no man’s land? Many WWI trench warfare soldiers suffered from “shell shock,” a combat stress reaction similar to today’s post-traumatic stress disorder. How do the stresses of WWI relate to soldiers today? June 27th at Cloud County Historical Society Museum at 1:30pm. Click here for details.

Clay Center: Preservation Workshop
This public preservation workshop will be led by Cynthia Harris, archivist at Kansas State University‘s Hale Library. The preservation workshop is aimed at helping veterans and their families preserve material related to military service, and is a part of “The Things They Carried Home” grants initiative. Sponsored by the Solomon Valley-Hwy 24-Heritage Alliance. June 27th at Clay County Historical Society at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

Augusta: An Unlikely History
They come in all shapes, sizes, and colors and are some of the most recognizable characters of our state: the mascots of Kansas! From the most recognizable, like the KU Jayhawk and the K-State Wildcat, to the more obscure Fowler High School Goldbugs and the Hill City Ringnecks, Jordan Poland, Speakers Bureau, features the history and pageantry of Kansas mascots. Explore with us the unique, historical ties that many sports mascots have to their communities before playing the state’s newest and greatest trivia game, “Name that Kansas Mascot!” June 27th at Augusta Public Library at 10:30am. Click here for details.

For more information about upcoming KHC-supported events in your region, visit our calendar.

 

 

Humanities Happenings: 06/19-06/21

Don’t miss the last weekend of the “Hometown Teams” Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition in Greensburg, and read on to find out about unique KHC-supported events in Cottonwood Falls, Lawrence, Lansing, and more.

 

Photo courtesy of Pageantry, Inc.

Photo courtesy of Pageantry, Inc.

Great Bend: Dixieland Jazz on the Lawn & Watermelon Feed
The “Argonne Rebels Drum & Bugle Corps” partner site exhibition continues at the Great Bend Public Library this weekend. Join local musicians as they share their talents on the library lawn.

This event supports “Argonne Rebels Drum & Bugle Corps,” a special partner site exhibit that tells the story of a competitive drum and bugle corps established in Great Bend in the 1940s. The exhibit is on display through August 31st.

The project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. June 19th at Great Bend Public Library at 6:00pm. Click here for details.

 

The Lady Bulldogs of Chase County, 2015 State Softball Champions. Image courtesy of Chase County Historical Society.

Cottonwood Falls: “A League of Our Own”
The public is invited to opening of “Chase County: A League of Our Own,” a special partner site exhibit that explores the baseball tradition of rural Chase County. Special guests include local athletes and longtime coaching staff. The exhibit is on display through November 14th.

This project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. June 20th at Chase County Historical Society at 1:00pm. Click here for details.

 

 

Photo courtesy of Beverly Gardner and Watkins Museum of History

Photo courtesy of Beverly Gardner and Watkins Museum of History

Lawrence: “Larryville Offbeat Sports Day”
Watch and learn how to play some of Lawrence’s favorite unconventional team sports at this day-long festival. Featuring exhibition games from Scary Larry Bike Polo, the Kaw Valley Kickball League, pickleball, the University of Kansas Quidditch Team, a Red Dog’s Dog Days workout, and more.

This event supports “Of Two Minds: The Conventional and Unconventional Sides of Lawrence Sports,” a series of public events. The project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. Sponsored by Watkins Museum of History. June 20th at East Lawrence Recreation Center at 10:00am. Click here for details.

 

Larry Burke

Larry Burke

Abilene: Trench Warfare
Soldiers in the trenches of World War I suffered extreme temperatures, disease, and parasites in addition to the psychological stresses of war. Larry Burke, Speakers Bureau, explores events leading to the outbreak of war, and will examine the strategies and tactics of trench warfare with special emphasis on the individuals who fought the war along the Western Front. How did the soldiers cope with the immense stress of the trenches? How did they find the courage to go “over the top” into the maelstrom of no man’s land? Many WWI trench warfare soldiers suffered from “shell shock,” a combat stress reaction similar to today’s post-traumatic stress disorder. How do the stresses of WWI relate to soldiers today? June 20th at Dickinson County Historical Society at 7:00pm. Click here for details.

 

Deborah White

Deborah White

Independence: Preservation Workshop
This public preservation workshop will be led by Deborah White, Digital Librarian at Pittsburg State University’s Axe Library. The preservation workshop is aimed at helping veterans and their families preserve material related to military service.

This event supports “The 1011th -A Story of Service Throughout the Years,” a project to collect and preserve the images of veterans who served with the 1011th Quartermaster Company, US Army Reserve, during deployments to Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Sponsored by RSVP Four County. June 20th at Memorial Hall at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

Funding is provided by the Kansas Humanities Council, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Standing Together initiative.

 

Jordan Poland

Jordan Poland

Greensburg: From Jayhawks to Goldbugs
They come in all shapes, sizes, and colors and are some of the most recognizable characters of our state: the mascots of Kansas! From the most recognizable, like the KU Jayhawk and the K-State Wildcat, to the more obscure Fowler High School Goldbugs and the Hill City Ringnecks, Jordan Poland, Speakers Bureau, shares the history and pageantry of Kansas mascots. Explore the unique, historical ties that many sports mascots have to their communities before playing the state’s newest and greatest trivia game, “Name that Kansas Mascot!” June 20th at Kiowa County Historical Museum & Soda Fountain at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

 

 

William E. Fischer, Jr.

William E. Fischer, Jr.

Lansing: Dark Skies
Popular images of chivalrous World War I aviators, goggled with silk scarves flowing, were quite different from the dark reality of the skies above Europe. As the war stalemated across Western Europe and casualties began to mount, aviation became a critical component in war planning and operations. Cutting-edge technology on land, sea, and air ensured that the war of November 1918 little resembled the war of August 1914. William E. Fischer, Jr., Speakers Bureau, explores how aviation became sophisticated and differentiated into aerial observation, bombardment, and pursuit. June 20th at Lansing Historical Museum at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

Stay up to date with upcoming KHC-supported events by visiting our Calendar of Events.

 

 

 

 

Preservation Workshops Rewarding Experience for All

Audrey Coleman and a Vietnam War veteran examining a bamboo quiver and arrows. Photo courtesy of: Patty Locher

Audrey Coleman and a Vietnam War veteran in Sabetha. Photo courtesy of: The Sabetha Herald.

In January, KHC awarded grants to thirteen organizations as part of Standing Together, a National Endowment for the Humanities initiative to promote understanding of the military experience and to support returning veterans. Each organization received a $300 grant to host public community workshops, led by a preservation consultant, to help veterans and their families learn how to preserve uniforms, medals, letters, photographs, email correspondence, and other important items that soldiers carried home.

So far, Mary Cotton Public Library, Friends of Fort Scott National Historic Site, Coffey County Library-Lebo Branch, Leavenworth Public Library, Watkins Museum of History, and Friends of the Valley Center Public Library have successfully hosted preservation workshops. Nearly 100 Kansans have attended the workshops to learn how to preserve their history, and to share military-related objects and stories.

For veterans, their relatives, and curious citizens, “The Things They Carried Home” preservation workshops have proved both engaging and helpful. Audrey Coleman, Senior Archivist at Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics, explained, “In general, there is a big concern among attendees that they ‘do the right thing'” with their materials, whether these are documents, journals, or photographs.

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Preservation consultant Marla Day leads the workshop in Lawrence. Photo courtesy of: Richard Rees

Perhaps the biggest challenge with handling these materials is trying to strike a balance between properly storing them and wanting to display them in the home. Coleman said that, more often than not, “the best, right thing is to do very little with their materials” and keep them “in an interior climate-controlled environment.”

In addition to educating the public on proper preservation techniques, preservation consultants and project directors felt they themselves gained something meaningful from the workshops. Participants who shared military objects often opened the door to broader discussions about military experiences across time and place.

Kim Turner, the project director for the Leavenworth Public Library workshop, said, “Discussion of preservation led to discussion of objects and the stories behind them. Real life stories gave the wars a human face. Sacrifice we have heard about but to hear it from those directly involved is humbling.”

If you or someone you know is interested in participating in a “The Things They Carried Home” preservation workshop, there are seven more opportunities, with the next workshop taking place on June 18th at Abilene Public Library. Workshops are free and open to the public. For details on all upcoming preservation workshops, visit KHC’s calendar of events.

 

 

KHC Awards Veterans’ Grants to 17 Organizations

TTTCHKHC recently awarded $14,420 in The Things They Carried Home grants to seventeen organizations. Local contributions to the projects are estimated at $25,803. The grants support preservation projects and preservation workshops related to veterans and military service. The grants are part of Standing Together, a National Endowment for the Humanities initiative to promote understanding of the military experience and to support returning veterans.

Preservation Project Grants

Four organizations received Preservation Project Grants to preserve, document, and create access to military artifacts and archival materials.

RezVets, Leawood ($3,000)

“Writing My Way Back Home”
Writers’ workshops offer military veterans and their families an opportunity to document the veterans’ experience. Cindy McDermott, project director.

RSVP Four County, Independence ($2,988)

“The 1011th – A Story of Service Throughout the Years”
A project to collect and preserve the images of veterans who served with the 1011th Quartermaster Company Army Reserve during deployments in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Kathy Shephard, project director.

Solomon Valley – Highway 24 – Heritage Alliance, Glasco ($2,950)

“World War II Veterans Memorial Highway: A Tour of Remembrance, A Corridor of Service”
A project to inventory veterans memorials and collections of veterans artifacts in museums located along the route of US 24 designated as the World War II Veterans Memorial Highway. Joan Nothern, project director.

Wamego Public Library ($1,582)

“Veterans Oral History Project Conversion”
The library will digitize and preserve over 50 oral history interviews of Pottawatomie County veterans. Kelley Nordberg, project director.

Preservation Workshops

Thirteen organizations received $300 grants to host public community workshops, led by a preservation consultant, to help veterans and their families preserve uniforms, medals, letters, photographs, email correspondence, and other important items that soldiers carried home.

Abilene Public Library
Belleville Public Library
Brown County Historical Society, Hiawatha
Emporia Public Library
Friends of Fort Scott National Historic Site
Friends of the Valley Center Library, Inc.
Kinsley Library
Leavenworth Public Library
Lebo Branch of Coffey County Public Library
Mary Cotton Public Library, Sabetha
Overland Park Historical Society
Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library
Watkins Museum of History, Lawrence

For more information about The Things They Carried Home grant projects, contact Murl Riedel, director of grants, at murl(at)kansashumanities.org.

The Things They Carried Home Grants

DoD photo by Senior Master Sgt. David H. Lipp, U.S. Air Force. Source.

DoD photo by Senior Master Sgt. David H. Lipp, U.S. Air Force. Source.

Application Deadline: 5:00 PM on December 17, 2014.

KHC invites museums, libraries, and other nonprofit organizations to apply for The Things They Carried Home grants supporting preservation projects and preservation workshops related to veterans and military service. Special consideration is given to projects focusing on service in the Korean, Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq Wars. Grants are available in two categories:  

1. Preservation Workshop Grants of up to $500 to support public community workshops, led by a preservation consultant, to help veterans and their families preserve uniforms, medals, letters, photographs, email correspondence, or other important items that soldiers carried home. Click here for guidelines.

2. Preservation Project Grants of up to $3,000 to support projects that preserve and create access to material related to military service. Click here for guidelines.

The Things They Carried Home grants are part of Standing Together, a National Endowment for the Humanities initiative to promote understanding of the military experience and to support returning veterans.

For more information, contact Murl Riedel, director of grants, at murl(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359.

Call for Speakers & Book Discussion Leaders

For Standing Together, a statewide initiative about the homecoming experiences of combat veterans.

Deadline: 5:00 PM Thursday, July 10, 2014
Click here to download the RFP

standing togetherIn September 2014, the Kansas Humanities Council will launch a statewide initiative, Standing Together, that explores the homecoming experiences of combat veterans. The initiative will begin with a series of book discussions and events focused on The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien in partnership with the NEA Big Read program.

KHC is looking for TALK book discussion leaders to facilitate community conversations focused on the book, and Speakers Bureau topics that explore the homecoming experiences of veterans. Discussion leaders and speakers receive an honorarium for each presentation event.

Click here for more information or contact Leslie Von Holten, director of programs, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359.

Image: Statue of the Three Servicemen – Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, D.C. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.