KHC Receives a Major Award

KHC board members Brandon Hines (left) and Aaron Otto (right) join KHC staff Julie Mulvihill (center) and Tracy Quillin (2nd from right) to accept the Schwartz Prize from Federation Board Member Kristina Valaitis (2nd from left). Not pictured: KHC Board Member Will Ramsey. Photo credit: Mark Garvin Photo.

KHC board members Brandon Hines (left) and Aaron Otto (right) join KHC staff Julie Mulvihill (center) and Tracy Quillin (2nd from right) to accept the Schwartz Prize from Federation Board Member Kristina Valaitis (2nd from left). Not pictured: KHC Board Member Will Ramsey. Photo credit: Mark Garvin Photo.

 

The Kansas Humanities Council received a 2014 Helen and Martin Schwartz Prize for KHC’s support of #QR1863, a Twitter re-enactment commemorating the 150th anniversary of Quantrill’s Raid on Lawrence, at an awards ceremony at the National Humanities Conference in Philadelphia, Pa., on October 31, 2014. Presented by the Federation of State Humanities Councils, the Schwartz Prize is awarded annually to up to three state humanities councils for innovative programs that have had a significant impact on citizens, organizations, or communities in their states. KHC joins Oregon Humanities and Utah Humanities in receiving the 2014 Schwartz Prize.

#QR1863 was a 2013 project supported through a KHC Humanities grant and coordinated by Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area in Lawrence. The project demonstrated the power of social media to engage citizens with the humanities through “live tweets” of the events of August, 21, 1863, when pro-Confederate forces launched a surprise raid on the pro-Union stronghold of Lawrence, leaving as many as 200 dead and a town in ruins. Community members researched historical texts and consulted with academic historians to compose tweets conveying the real time experiences of victims, raiders, and survivors.

Schwartz Prize judges praised the #QR1863 project for its creative and effective use of social media to engage the public with local history and for its reach and impact worldwide. One judge stated that they “loved the marriage between amateur history geeks, education, scholars, and the innovative use of technology.”

“We are thrilled to have #QR1863 recognized by the Federation of State Humanities Councils,” said Julie McPike, managing director of Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area. “The advice and support that Kansas Humanities Council provided for this project had a huge impact on its success. The collaboration between institutions, academic historians, volunteer citizen-historians, and the public created an accessible and multi-layered conversation about the events of the past and their impact on the present. #QR1863 exceeded our expectations in every way possible, including being recognized with the Schwartz Prize.”

All the #QR1863 tweets are available on Storify. Click here to read them.

Humanities grants for social media projects that connect citizens with the humanities are available. Click here or contact , director of grants, for more information.

Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11 Script Takes to Twitter

As a follow-up to the successful Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater project, Kansas Humanities Council plans to share the Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11 script with the Twitterverse. In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Quantrill’s 1863 raid on Lawrence, KHC will post bite-sized excerpts of the Reader’s Theater project script during the month of August. History buffs, native Kansans, and those interested in learning more about this notorious part of history on the Kansas-Missouri border are encouraged to engage in this KHC-led event!

Image via: twitter.com.

Image via: twitter.com.

Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11 is a compilation of primary sources that range from letters and witness accounts to historical and contemporary newspaper articles. Historians from Kansas and Missouri have reviewed the primary source material, script, and citations to ensure accuracy. The Shared Stories of the Civil War project is a partnership between Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area and the Kansas Humanities Council.

The Kansas Humanities Council is excited to share the story of Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11 through Twitter and a corresponding blog post series. From August 1 to the anniversary of Quantrill’s Raid on August 21, @kshumanities will share chronological excerpts of the script.  A short teaser will appear along with links to the full text of that day’s excerpt. Twitter followers can click on the short link to read the entirety of the day’s script and access source citations on KHC’s blog. Watch the events of Quantrill’s raid unfold and digest a daily dose of Kansas history!

Each tweet will be posted with the Twitter handle #QR1863. Use this hashtag to comment, retweet, and share this rich piece of Civil War history with friends and the rest of the Twitterverse! Be sure to follow @kshumanities for updates about this project and click here to read the blog posts!

 

Civil War on the Western Front

In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Quantrill’s Raid on Lawrence and the issuance of Order No. 11, KHC is featuring excerpts from the “Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11″ Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater script. The Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater project is a partnership between KHC and the Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area.                                                  

Monument Honoring Victims of Quantrill's Raid

Monument Honoring Victims of Quantrill’s Raid, Photo courtesy of: kansasmemory.org, Kansas State Historical Society. Copy and Reuse Restrictions apply.

NARRATOR: For Kansans and Missourians, there still remain competing opinions about how to remember and commemorate the Civil War on the western front.

READER 1: The Lawrence Massacre will always stand among the marked massacres of the world. In some respects it was unique, and had features of its own that distinguished it from any other. In the suddenness with which it fell, the speed with which it was accomplished, the hatred and vindictiveness with which it was persecuted, the violence and brutality by which it was characterized, it stands alone as something unique in history.

Rev. Richard Cordley, “Memorial Sermon,” August 21, 1892.

Stay tuned for final thoughts on Order No. 11 and the Border Wars tomorrow morning.

Remembering the Raid

In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Quantrill’s Raid on Lawrence and the issuance of Order No. 11, KHC is featuring excerpts from the “Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11″ Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater script. The Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater project is a partnership between KHC and the Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area.                                                  

1925 Reunion of Quantrill's Raid Survivors

1925 Reunion of Quantrill’s Raid Survivors, Photo courtesy of: kansasmemory.org, Kansas State Historical Society. Copy and Reuse Restrictions apply.

                                                                                                     READER 4: Who and what were the raiders who came to Lawrence to murder and destroy [They] were technically Confederate soldiers, but they received no orders, made no reports, and were in every way as irresponsible as when they were stealing horse and cattle and Negroes on their own account . . . [Quantrill was] a thin, cold, bloodless man with great personal vanity, jealous of all who dared to try to divide the spot-light with him, cruel and relentless in all his methods . . .

The day of restoration and requital will come, and when that eternal day has dawned, joy, God given, unspeakable joy, will have come with the morning.

Charles Sumner Gleed, “The Lawrence Massacre and Its Lessons,” delivered August 21, 1913, Lawrence, Kansas.

READER 5: The story of the raid never grows cold here and the blood of the old settlers who survived the blood lusting raiders, still boils when they read each year of the celebrations at Independence of the very men who shot down their friends and neighbors and relatives and burned their homes and stores.

Lawrence Daily Journal-World, August 21, 1909.

Where does Quantrill’s Raid fit in Civil War history? Tomorrow, watch for the second-to-last blog post!

Commemorating Victims and Survivors

In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Quantrill’s Raid on Lawrence and the issuance of Order No. 11, KHC is featuring excerpts from the “Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11″ Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater script. The Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater project is a partnership between KHC and the Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area.                                                  

1913 Reunion of Quantrill's Raid Survivors

1913 Reunion of Quantrill’s Raid Survivors, Photo courtesy of: Library of Congress.

NARRATOR: Meanwhile, in Lawrence, survivors of the Raid met to commemorate the losses of their friends and family members. Beginning with the first on August 21, 1891, reunions were held by the Association of Survivors of Quantrill’s Massacre so that “the young generation should learn of the patriotism that actuated those who saved Lawrence from the invaders.” These meetings were not held annually — mainly because of disagreements over how to properly commemorate the event. In 1913, on the 50th anniversary of the raid, a list of survivors was compiled and 200 of the remaining 550 living survivors were in attendance. There were, however, contradictory feelings.

READER 3: The sorrows of those days live with us and the memory of heroism cannot be allowed to perish. But the bitterness is gone.

Lawrence Daily Journal-World, August 22, 1913.

The violence of Quantrill’s Raid lived on in the minds of many nineteenth-century Kansans. Check back tomorrow for a glimpse into their thoughts on the attack.

Episode Four: The Legacy of Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11

In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Quantrill’s Raid on Lawrence and the issuance of Order No. 11, KHC is featuring excerpts from the “Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11″ Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater script. The Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater project is a partnership between KHC and the Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area.                                                  

Harry S. Truman

Harry S. Truman, Photo courtesy of: Library of Congress.

NARRATOR: In the years that followed, Kansans and Missourians chose to remember Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11 by holding public commemorations. In 1888, two decades after the Lawrence massacre, the surviving members of Quantrill’s Raiders met in Blue Springs, Missouri. The distinguished guest of the “Ice Cream Social” was none other than William Quantrill’s own mother, Caroline Clarke Quantrill. Between 1888 and 1929, there were 32 reported reunions of Quantrill’s Raiders. Today, members of the William Clarke Quantrill Society meet annually for reunions in western Missouri.

READER 1: [The guerrillas] were an intelligent and well-behaved lot of men, and did not seem possessed of any of the bloodthirsty characteristics ascribed to them. If they ever had, the refining influence of 23 years of peace and civilization have evidently transformed them into good law abiding citizens.

Kansas City Journal, May 12, 1888.

READER 4: But Quantrill and his men were no more bandits than the men on the other side. I’ve been to reunions of Quantrill’s men two or three times. All they were trying to do was protect the property on the Missouri side of the line.

Harry S. Truman.

Tomorrow, find out how survivors chose to commemorate the victims of Quantrill’s Raid.

Reminiscences

In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Quantrill’s Raid on Lawrence and the issuance of Order No. 11, KHC is featuring excerpts from the “Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11″ Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater script. The Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater project is a partnership between KHC and the Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area.                                                  

Reminiscences of the Women of Missouri During the Sixties

Reminiscences of the Women of Missouri During the Sixties, Image via: Cass County Historical Society.

READER 5: My father was too old for service, but he aided the South in every way he could . . . A southern soldier always got something to eat at our house, and if practical, a place to sleep, and for this he was imprisoned during most of the war, and finally sentenced to be shot.

Finally Order No. 11 was enforced, depopulating and devastating all the border counties south of the Missouri River, the refugees wending their way east and north (they were not permitted to go south) aimlessly, stopping wherever they could get assistance. O, the misery! Old men, women and children plodding the dusty roads barefooted, with nothing to eat save what was furnished by friendly citizens.

Mrs. W.H. Gregg, published in Reminiscences of the Women of Missouri During the Sixties, 1913. 

READER 3: The home of my mother, 70 years old, was burned. She had neither husband or son; she was an invalid, confined to her bed. She was accused of sending a ham of mean to Quantrill’s camp. It was a false accusation, but she owned slaves and had to suffer for it although innocence of the charge against her.

Frances Fristowe Twyman.

READER 4: After General Ewing of the Union army issued his famous Order No. 11, many citizens left their homes and fled for their lives beyond the boundary lines of Jackson County. In many instances their homes, with the accumulated earnings of a lifetime, were burned before their eyes, their stock appropriated or driven to camp, “confiscated,” as it was called. The home thus rudely broken up, the inmates were forced to seek shelter wherever they could find it. I was in Jackson County on a mission of love and mercy for our sick and wounded soldiers, and I remember having counted twenty-nine blackened chimneys which marked the spot where once stood that number of country homes.

Mrs. S.E. Ustick, published in Reminiscences of the Women of Missouri During the Sixties, 1913. 

READER 3: The road from Independence to Lexington was crowded with women and children, women walking with their babies in their arms, packs on their backs, and four or five children following after them — some crying for bread, some crying to be taken back to their homes.

Frances Fristowe Twyman, published in Reminiscences of the Women of Missouri During the Sixties, 1913.

What do you think were the political and personal consequences of Order No. 11? Tune in tomorrow to learn more.

Mr. Crawford

In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Quantrill’s Raid on Lawrence and the issuance of Order No. 11, KHC is featuring excerpts from the “Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11″ Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater script. The Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater project is a partnership between KHC and the Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area.                                                

Quantrill's Raid

Quantrill’s Raid, Image courtesy of: kansasmemory.org, Kansas State Historical Society. Copy and Reuse Restrictions apply.

NARRATOR: Frances Twyman later recounted the story of one Mr. Crawford who, like other Missouri farmers, supported the South but had no slaves. The following events occurred just before Order Number 11 was carried out.                                                

READER 3: Mr. Crawford, an old man with a large family of children, was a southern sympathizer, but had never taken up arms against the government. He went to the mill one day with a sack of corn to have it ground to make bread for his wife and children . . . Two o clock came and the husband was still absent. The children were hungry, crying for something to eat. The mother would say, “Papa will soon be here, then my darlings shall have something to eat.”

READER 2: Three o clock came, and the mother saw a company of soldiers approaching. They rode up to the door; the mother looked out and saw her husband a prisoner in their midst. He was told to dismount. Then they shot him down before the eyes of his wife and child, shot down like a wild beast. The mother was told to get out of the house with her children, as they were going to burn the house.

READER 3: Her husband killed, her house burned, she and her little children turned out in the cold world homeless and destitute. Her only son, 14 years old, went to Quantrill [as] he had not other place to go. Such act as this is what made Bushwhackers. Oh, how strange that men, made in the image of God, could be so cruel and heartless.

Frances Fristowe Twyman.

Trouble on the border continues in the next blog post. Be sure to check back tomorrow for a new installment!

Episode Three: Order Number 11 and the Violence in Missouri

In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Quantrill’s Raid on Lawrence and the issuance of Order No. 11, KHC is featuring excerpts from the “Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11″ Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater script. The Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater project is a partnership between KHC and the Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area.                                                  

Order Number 11

Order Number 11, Image courtesy of: Missouri Valley Special Collections, Kansas City Public Library, Kansas City, Missouri.

NARRATOR: On August 25, 1863, just four days after the destruction in Lawrence, the commander of the District of the Border, Thomas Ewing, issued Order Number 11, evicting the populations of Jackson, Cass, Bates, and Vernon counties in Missouri. The intent was to prevent more raids from crossing the border into Kansas. Residents had 15 days to flee their homes, which for many, meant leaving behind most of their possessions. Some rushed to hide their valuables before their properties were abandoned. An estimated 20,000 people were made refugees. They made their exodus under sweltering sun — barefoot, and with little clothes and food. The Order particularly affected women, some of whose husbands and sons were fighting on behalf of the Confederacy.  

READER 1: We were very soon convinced that we would not be allowed to remain very long. Each day the federals were becoming more and more antagonistic toward the southern families. One of their officials made a speech in Stockton saying he was in favor of driving the southern women and children out of the country, rob them of their sustenance, burn their houses, and force them out, if in no other way strap them astride a hickory pole to get them out.                                                                                    

A little later on they issued an order [General Order Number 11] for all southern families to leave and if for any cause they failed to comply, their houses were to be burned and they driven out. It was this last order that caused me to emigrate to Texas.

Partheny Horn, Memoirs, February 14, 1919.

READER 2: It is well-known that men were shot down in the very act of obeying the order, and their wagons and effects seized by their murderers. Barefooted and bare-headed women and children, stripped of every article of clothing except a scant covering for their bodies, were exposed to the August sun and compelled to struggle through the dust on foot . . . [Order Number 11 was] an act of purely arbitrary power, directed against a disarmed and defenseless population. It was an exhibition of cowardice in its most odious and repulsive form.

George Caleb Bingham, 1877.

Is Ewing’s Order No. 11 fair or justified? Tune in tomorrow for more on this controversial declaration.

Aftermath

In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Quantrill’s Raid on Lawrence and the issuance of Order No. 11, KHC is featuring excerpts from the “Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11″ Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater script. The Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater project is a partnership between KHC and the Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area.                                                

John Speer

John Speer, Image Courtesy of: kansasmemory.org, Kansas State Historical Society. Copy and Reuse Restrictions apply.

NARRATOR: The final statistics for the raid were unclear, but undoubtedly staggering. At least 180 citizens were killed, with at least 30 wounded. 80 were left as widows, and 250 children were made orphans, while countless others were left to fend for themselves while their husbands and sons served in the Union army. Property loss was estimated to be no less than $1.5 million, and 200 buildings in total were demolished. One of Quantrill’s goals was left unaccomplished — the notorious James Lane, the target of much of Quantrill’s anger, survived by jumping out his window and fleeing into a cornfield. Clearly for Kansans, Quantrill’s deeds could not be left unpunished.                                             

READER 2: The Missouri border counties, south of the Kaw, have furnished the “sinews” to the whole expedition. They, and they alone, should be held accountable. There is where the swift bolt of destruction should fall — and even there, in God’s name, let discrimination be made between the innocent and the guilty.

Leavenworth Daily Times, August 28, 1863.

READER 4: Lawrence, Kansas

The universal testimony of all the ladies and others who talked with the butchers of the 21st ultimately is that these demons claimed they were here to revenge the wrongs done [to] their families by our men under Lane, Jennison, Anthony, and Company. They said they would be more merciful than were these men when they went into Missouri.

Letter, “One of the Sufferers” to S.N. Wood, Council Grove Press, September 14, 1863.

READER 5: Last night was the most bitter cold of the season. We pity those who, last year at this time, had comfortable homes, and husbands and fathers to provide for them, but are now deprived of both.

John Speer, Kansas Tribune, December 31, 1863.

Order No. 11 is on the horizon. Find out what the order means for Missourians in tomorrow’s blog post.