Humanities Happenings – Kansas Day Edition

The “Langston’s Lawrence” documentary short film premiere on January 27 kicks off a Kansas Day weekend of hometown humanities.

Sunday, January 29th marks 156 years of Kansas statehood. What better way to celebrate than with a weekend of hometown humanities events highlighting the Kansas stories that move us and make us?

Lawrence: Langston’s Lawrence

The Watkins Museum of History’s Art of Conversation series features the debut of “Langston’s Lawrence.” The documentary short film about the life of young Langston Hughes is followed by a panel discussion with Hughes scholars Randal Jelks, Edgar Tidwell, and Carmaletta M. Williams. The film project is supported by a KHC Humanities grant. Friday, January 27 at 6:00 PM at the Watkins Museum of History. Details here.

North Newton: Head ‘Em Up & Move ‘Em Out

The early days of ranching and trail driving required stamina and determination. The drover of yesteryear had little choice but to face the elements placed before him if he was to get his wild cattle to market. A thousand miles on the trail brought him into contact with all that nature could throw at him: lightning, flooded rivers, tornadoes, and stampeding cattle. Jim Gray’s Speakers Bureau presentation explores this exciting story of cowboys, cattle, and the steak on your plate. Saturday, January 28 at 11:00 AM at Kauffman Museum. Details here.

Derby: Kansas Weather in Life, Literature, and Photography

When it comes to talking about the weather, we have a lot to say in Kansas, and for good reason: not only is our weather some of the most dramatic in the world, but our relationship to weather shapes how we see ourselves. Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg’s Speakers Bureau presentation opens with weather chaser Stephen Locke’s vibrant images of Kansas paired with poetry by contemporary Kansas writers inspired by the drama that unfolds in the Kansas sky. Saturday, January 28 at 10:00 AM at Derby Public Library. Details here.

El Dorado: Community Writing Workshop with Kim Stanley

Just as William Allen White defended free speech “by voice, by posted card, by letter, or by press,” participants in this Community Writing Workshop are welcome to express themselves through essays, poems, letters to the editor, memoirs, fiction — any way they so choose. Part of the Pulitzer Project in Kansas: William Allen White and Freedom of Speech. Saturday, January 28 at 10:00 AM at Bradford Memorial Library. Details here.

Paola & Wichita: Poet Laureate of Kansas™

Join Eric McHenry, Poet Laureate of Kansas™, for readings and discussions about poetry in two Kansas communities this weekend.
Saturday, January 28 at 1:00 PM at Paola High School. Sponsored by Paola Chamber of CommerceDetails here.
Sunday, January 29 at 2:00 PM at Wichita Public Library. Details here.

Stockton: Lawbreakers for the Common Good

In the mid-1800s, some Kansans defied federal, state, and territorial laws in pursuit of a common goal: liberty for all. Anne P.W. Hawkins’ Speakers Bureau presentation explores true accounts of little-known operatives who worked illegally on the Underground Railroad in Kansas, a clandestine network that helped guide enslaved people to freedom. Sunday, January 29 at 2:00 PM at Rooks County Historical Society & Museum. Details here.

Find more hometown humanities events on KHC’s Calendar.

Can We Count on You?

News outlets recently began reporting on the possible plan to eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, and other important agencies critical to our American democracy. Many of us thought the same thing: We won’t let this happen. Kansans depend on the humanities.

At this time, the threat of elimination exists in a report and not in an actual budget. We remain heartened by the bipartisan support we have seen for the humanities in Congress over the last 45 years. We’ll work hard to make sure it stays that way, but we are going to need your help.

Are you willing to speak up on behalf of the humanities and the Kansas Humanities Council? Click here and let us know. When the time is right, we will call on you first to share our story with your member of Congress.

Here are two things you can do right now:

  1. Sign up to be the first to know.
  2. Share this message with a friend.

Thank you for your support of the humanities!

12 Months of the Humanities

Happy New Year from the Kansas Humanities Council!

As we embark upon a new year, KHC has 12 months of hometown humanities experiences to keep you engaged and inspired in 2017.

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2016 in Stories

Kansans know that stories teach us, unite us, move us, and make us and that’s why telling Kansas stories is so much a part of what KHC does. Last year, KHC supported 788 humanities events in 127 communities and worked with 197 organizations. Just picture those 788 times when Kansans gathered to share, listen, and engage with the history and ideas that shape us. These gatherings happened from the east to the west, in small towns and large, with crowds of all sizes. Here are a few highlights from 2016:

A new year is right around the corner. Here is a sneak preview of what’s to come for Kansas:

  • New discussions, exhibits, and presentations on the future of water in our state.
  • A new Poet Laureate of Kansas™ ready to travel to you.
  • A new addition to our Big Culture Boost series for cultural nonprofits.

Please make a gift to keep the new stories going in the new years. 
Click here to make your tax-deductible donation to KHC. 

donate

Thank you for making 2016 a great year for the humanities!

Humanities Happenings 11/19-11/20

"Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve: A Flint Hills Love Story." Image courtesy of Prairie Hollow Productions.

“Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve: A Flint Hills Love Story.” Image courtesy of Prairie Hollow Productions.

Take a journey this weekend to learn about our shared history, experience the Kansas landscape, and consider what it takes to create a new home.

Dodge City & St. Francis: Kansas Legends and Folktales

Grasshoppers so big that cowboys can ride them to herd cattle. Summers so hot that corn pops in the field. Kansas is a place of big skies and tall tales, but these exaggerated narratives help us understand the character of our state and its people. Jim Hoy’s Speakers Bureau presentation explores some of the many Kansas legends and folktales and help audiences decipher between a myth (folk religion), legend (folk history), and tale (folk literature).
Dodge City: November 19 at 2:00 PM at Boot Hill Museum. Details.
St. Francis: November 20 at 2:00 PM at Cheyenne Center for Creativity. Details.

Goodland: Dressing for Success, Victorian Style

Victorian Women in the United States and Britain took upward of four hours to dress themselves per day, and they usually had a maid to help them dress. Sara Jane Richter’s Speakers Bureau presentation explores why women endured such restrictive and sometimes deadly clothing, as well as the elements, purpose, and the proper way to put it all on. November 19 at 10:00 AM MT at the High Plains Museum. Details.

Garden City: The Beautiful Things that Heaven Bears

In 1990 Sepha Stephanos fled the Ethiopian revolution. Now he finds himself running a grocery store in a poor African American neighborhood in Washington, D.C. His only companions are two fellow African immigrants, a Congolese waiter and a Kenyan engineer, who share his feelings of frustration with and bitter nostalgia for their home continent. Told in a haunting and powerful first-person narrative that casts the streets of D.C. and Addis Ababa through Sepha’s eyes, Dinaw Mengestu’s novel illuminates what it means to lose a family and country — and what it takes to create a new home. Byron Caminero-Santangelo leads the TALK book discussion at the Finney County Public Library on November 19 at 11:00 AM. Details.

Manhattan: A Flint Hills Love Story

Prairie Hollow Productions and the Flint Hills Discovery Center Foundation host a screening of “Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve: A Flint Hills Love Story.”  The documentary film, supported by a KHC Humanities grant, focuses on the efforts to create a national park in the Flint Hills of Chase County. November 20 at 1:00 PM at Wareham Opera House. Details.

Find more humanities events on KHC’s Calendar of Events.

Give Stories that Move Us and Make Us

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Stories drive the humanities. Stories that make us who we are, stories that move us, stories that unite us, and stories that inspire us to engage in our communities.

Last year, 788 humanities events shared and preserved stories in 127 Kansas communities. More are waiting. Will you help?

KHC is $2,000 away from meeting a $15,000 challenge from the KHC Board of Directors for our annual fall fundraising campaign. Your #GivingTuesday gift keeps the humanities thriving in Kansas through the power of stories.

Support the humanities in Kansas on #GivingTuesday.

donate

Humanities Happenings 11/11-11/12

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A rich array of humanities program awaits you this weekend in Kansas. Which one will you choose?

North Newton: When Freedom Changed America

One hundred years separate the Emancipation Proclamation (1863) and the March on Washington (1963). Both movements were defined by the pursuit of freedom: one from the institution of slavery, the other from economic and political inequality. But what did freedom mean to Americans who participated in these historical events? John Edgar Tidwell’s Speakers Bureau presentation explores how today, as seekers of the American Dream, we can learn a great deal from the devotion and commitment of those looking to reclaim America and the principles for which it stands. Friday, November 11 at 11:00 AM at Bethel College. Details.

Marion: The Barn Raisers

The Kansas Barn Alliance presents the Kansas premiere of “The Barn Raisers,” a film produced by Fourth Wall Films and supported by a KHC Humanities Grant. The film shows that a closer look at the architecture of barns reveals much about the history, traditions, and culture of rural America. Click here to watch the trailer. Saturday, November 12 at 2:00 PM at the Marion Community Center. Details.

Emporia: A Flint Hills Love Story

Commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve and the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service at the premiere screening of “Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve: A Flint Hills Love Story.” Produced by Prairie Hollow Productions and the Flint Hills Discovery Center Foundation with the support of a KHC Humanities Grant, the film looks at the decades-long effort to establish a national park in the Flint Hills. Click here for a trailer. Saturday, November 12 at 7:00 PM at the Emporia Granada Theatre. Click here to register for the premiere. Details.

Garden City: On-Air Book Discussion

High Plains Public Radio Readers Book Club’s Fall Read, “Borders – Immigration,” wraps up with an on-air book discussion exploring the theme of borders and immigration in “My Antonia” by Willa Cather, “Enrique’s Journey” by Sonia Nazario, and “What is the What?” by Dave Eggers. Supported by a KHC Humanities Grant. Saturday, November 12. Details.

Lawrence: From Slavery to a Free State

Marla Jackson and Bobbi Rahder present the story of the life and legacy of Maria Rogers Martin, a quilter and former slave who came to Lawrence, Kansas, with abolitionists in 1862. Supported by a KHC Heritage Grant. Saturday, November 12 at 3:00 PM at the African American Quilt Museum & Textile Academy. Details.

Belleville: Community Writing Workshop

Daniel Hoyt leads a Community Writing Workshop at the Belleville Public Library as part of the Pulitzer Project in Kansas. Just as William Allen White defended free speech “by voice, by posted card, by letter, or by press,” participants are welcome to express themselves through essays, poems, letters to the editor, memoirs, fiction — any way they so chose. Saturday, November 12 at 1:00 PM. Details.

Find more humanities events in Kansas on KHC’s Calendar of Events.

Apply to Host the Bill of Rights Display

 

Bill of RightsClick here for the application (pdf)
Click here for display requirements (pdf)

December 2016 marks the 225th anniversary of the Bill of Rights and the Kansas Humanities Council invites museums, libraries, community centers, and other Kansas nonprofit venues to apply to host a special pop-up display from the National Archives.

Interested? Here are the details:

Submit an application to KHC by October 7, 2016.

Provide the following information:

  • Applicant/Organization Name:
  • Address:
  • Contact Person:
  • Contact Person email:
  • Contact Person phone number:
  • Venue:
  • Venue shipping address:
  • Why does your organization or community want to host the Bill of Rights pop-up display? (limit to 250 words)
  • Do you plan to sponsor any public programs associated with the display? Describe briefly. (limit 250 words)

Submit application materials to:
Valerie Mendoza, Grants Coordinator
Kansas Humanities Council
email: grants(at)kansashumanities.org

Bill of Rights Display Details

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Bill of Rights exhibit

  • The display will be sent directly to you from the National Archives at the end of November.
  • There is no cost to you to host the display.
  • Display size is 66 1/2 inches high, 32 inches wide, and has a footboard of 45 inches square (see photo).
  • Display comes in two pieces to be assembled by you.
  • The display must on exhibit by December 15, 2016.
  • The display  may be exhibited as long as you like, but minimally through December 31, 2016.
  • The display is yours to keep.
  • Educational materials on the Bill of Rights are available through the National Archives website including links to documents, lesson plans, and a 3 minute video.
  • Public programs related to the display are optional but encouraged.
  • Opportunities for public programs related to the display provided by the Kansas Humanities Council include hosting a Pulitzer Project speaker or community writing workshop on the First Amendment rights to free speech and a free press. Click here for more details.
  • A final report must be submitted to the Kansas Humanities Council by February 28, 2017.

Humanities Happenings 7/22-7/28

 

speakers discussionTake one speaker presenting a unique Kansas story followed by engaging community discussion and you have the formula for a lively humanities experience in Kansas. Find Speakers Bureau presentations and discussions in Augusta, Beloit, Great Bend, Greensburg, and Wichita this week.

Greensburg: Lawbreakers for the Common Good

In the mid-1800s, some Kansans defied federal, state, and territorial laws in pursuit of a common goal: liberty for all. Anne P.W. Hawkins’ Speakers Bureau presentation explores true accounts of little-known operatives who worked illegally on the Underground Railroad in Kansas, a clandestine network that helped guide enslaved people to freedom. Risking fearful penalties for their underground involvements, these men, women, and children–both black and white–offer us examples of what is possible for justice-seekers working together. Saturday, July 23 at 3:00 PM at Kiowa County Senior Center. Details here.

Augusta: The Kansas City Monarchs in Our Hometown

Formed in 1920, the Kansas City Monarchs revolutionized baseball: not only were they charter members of the Negro National League and the first professional team to use outdoor lighting, the Monarchs also sent more players to the major leagues than any other Negro Leagues franchise. Phil S. Dixon’s Speakers Bureau presentation explores the exciting early barnstorming days of the Monarchs, highlights great players such as Wilber “Bullet” Rogan, Satchel Paige, and Jackie Robinson who wore the uniform, and connects the spirit of the Monarchs to the many Kansas communities in which they played. Saturday, July 23 at 10:30 AM at Augusta Public Library. Details here.

Wichita: Head ‘Em Up & Move ‘Em Out

The early days of ranching and trail driving required stamina and determination. The drover of yesteryear had little choice but to face the elements placed before him if he was to get his wild cattle to market. A thousand miles on the trail brought him into contact with all that nature could throw at him: lightning, flooded rivers, hail, tornadoes, and stampeding cattle were constantly challenges. Jim Gray’s Speakers Bureau presentation looks at how the massive beef industry owes its beginnings to the men and women who were bold enough to “head ’em up and move ’em out.” Saturday, July 23 at 1:00 PM at Old Cowtown Museum. Details here.

Great Bend: Women Writers on the Santa Fe Trail

Some of the first women to travel across present-day Kansas were travelers on the Santa Fe Trail. Leo E. Oliva’s Speakers Bureau presentation looks at the adventures and reflections of four of these remarkable women who wrote their own stories. Susan Shelby Magoffin traveled with her husband’s wagon train in 1846, while Katie Bowen traveled the trail in 1851. From the age of 7 to 17, Marion Sloan Russell traveled the Santa Fe Trail five times with her single mother. Perhaps the most famous of this group, however, was suffragist and abolitionist Julia Archibald Holmes who wrote letters as she traveled the Santa Fe Trail across Kansas Territory to the Rocky Mountains, where she became the first woman to climb Pike’s Peak. Monday, July 25 at 7:30 PM at Barton County Historical Society. Sponsored by Santa Fe Trail Association, Quivira Chapter. Details here.

Wichita: Throw Like a Girl

Many female athletes in Kansas have fascinating tales of perseverance, hard work and success on levels where they were previously barred from competition. Laura Hartley’s Speakers Bureau presentation explores the landscape for women athletes in our country before and after Title IX legislation and how opportunities for women have impacted sports in our country. Wednesday, July 27 at 10: 00 AM at Wichita-Sedgwick County Historical Museum. Details here.

Beloit: Kansas Legends and Folktales

Grasshoppers so big that cowboys can ride them to herd cattle. Summers so hot that corn pops in the field. Ranching Henry Mudge wrecking pianos, shooting sheep, and fooling European dignitaries. Kansas is a place of big skies and tall tales, but these exaggerated narratives help us understand the character of our state and its people. Jim Hoy’s Speakers Bureau presentation explores some of the many Kansas legends and folktales and help audiences decipher between a myth (folk religion), legend (folk history), and tale (folk literature). Thursday, July 28 at 7:00 PM at Mitchell County Fair Association. Details here.

More Humanities Happenings in Kansas can be found on the KHC Calendar of Events.

Humanities Happenings 7/8-7/14

Vernon Rickman at work at the Smithsonian. Image courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution archives.

Vernon Rickman at work at the Smithsonian. Image courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution archives.

Newton: Soulful Life of a Kansas Artist

The Carriage Factory Art Gallery hosts the opening of “Vernon Rickman: Soulful Life of a Kansas Artist,” an exhibition exploring the life and work of Vernon Rickman, a Newton native who was staff artist and sculptor at the Smithsonian Institution. The exhibition is part of an oral history project supported by a KHC Heritage Grant. Saturday, July 9 at 7:00 PM at Carriage Factory Art Gallery. Details here. 

Park City: At Home on the Range

Community cookbooks have carried the stories of Kansas women over the years, sharing sentiments of home, family, and faith. Louis M. Hanson’s Speakers Bureau presentation provides a survey of Kansas cookbooks from 1874 to the present, which reveal not only changes in foodways but also poems, prayers, personal reflections, and histories. These humble publications show that food, home, community, and faith were the foundation upon which Kansas women constructed their lives. Saturday, July 9 at 7:00 PM at Park City Public Library. Details here.

Lincoln: Children of the Promised Land

Nicodemus, a small unincorporated town in Graham County, is the only remaining western town that was established by African Americans during the Reconstruction Period following the Civil War. Angela Bates’ pictorial history explores the unique experiences of the children of Nicodemus who were the first members of their families born free from the physical and psychological effects of slavery. Angela Bates’ Speakers Bureau presentation explores the stories of children conceived in slavery but born free, the experiences of mothers during this transitional time, and how baby names were changed or used to reflect attitudes about free-born children. Sunday, July 10 at 2:30 PM at Lincoln County Historical Society. Details here. 

Garden City, Osborne, and Kensington: Throw Like a Girl

Many female athletes in Kansas have fascinating tales of perseverance, hard work, and success on levels where they were previously barred from competition. Margaret Thompson Murdock of Berryton competed in the 1976 Olympics as the first woman to represent the United States in a shooting competition. Kendra Wecker, a native of Marysville, made headlines in 1995 when at age 12 she became the first girl to reach the finals of the NFL’s Punt, Pass, & Kick competition. Laura Hartley’s Speakers Bureau presentation explores the landscape for women athletes before and after Title IX legislation and how opportunities for women have impacted sports in our country.
Wednesday, July 13 at 6:00 PM at Finney County Public Library. Details here.
Thursday, July 14 at 12:00 PM at Osborne Public Library. Details here.
Thursday, July 14 at 5:00 PM at Kensington Community/School Library. Details here.

Dodge City: Kansas Legends and Folktales

Grasshoppers so big that cowboys can ride them to herd cattle. Summers so hot that corn pops in the field. Rancher Henry Mudge wrecking pianos, shooting sheep, and fooling European dignitaries. Kansas is a place of big skies and tall tales, but these exaggerated narratives help us understand the character of our state and its people. Jim Hoy’s Speakers Bureau presentation explores some of the many Kansas legends and folktales and help audiences decipher between a myth (folk religion), legend (folk history), and tale (folk literature). Sponsored by Kansas Genealogical Society. Thursday, July 14 at 2:00 PM at The Learning Center. Details here.

Kansas City: Podcast Party

Enjoy a burger and hear Kansas City area news reporters discuss new and interesting podcasts, including the Archiver podcast about Kansas history, supported by a KHC Humanities grant. Thursday, July 14 at 6:00 PM at Westport Flea Market. Details here.

Holton: Soda Fountains of Kansas

Relive the glory days of the soda fountain where tonics and curatives evolved into refreshments like the Brown Cow, the Mudslide, and the Egg Cream. Government regulations, World War I luxury taxes, and bottled soda pop prompted Kansas pharmacists to make more ice cream concoctions and add food to keep their evolving fountain sideline business profitable. Cindy Higgins’ Speakers Bureau presentation also explores soda fountains in Kansas today and the revival of soda fountains across the nation. Thursday, July 14 at 1:00 PM at Jackson County Historical Society. Details here.

Find more Humanities Happenings on KHC’s Calendar of Events.