Humanities Happenings 6/3-6/9

Photo credits (L to R) Mid-America All-Indian Center; Perry Pride; Mead, Larkin G. , , Collector. Walking dresses for January 1843 Engraved for the Lady's World. [Philadelphia, Pa.: Charles J. Peterson, 1843] Image. Retrieved from the Library of Congress

Photo credits (L to R) Mid-America All-Indian Center; Perry Pride; Mead, Larkin G. , , Collector. Walking dresses for January 1843 Engraved for the Lady’s World. [Philadelphia, Pa.: Charles J. Peterson, 1843] Image. Retrieved from the Library of Congress

A week’s worth of humanities events to get your June off to a lively start!

Concordia: Dressing for Success, Victorian Style

Victorian women in the United States and Britain took upward of four hours to dress themselves per day, and they usually had a maid to help them. Layer upon layer of prim and proper clothing was worn, from bare necessities to gloves, hair pins, umbrellas, shoes, and brooches. There were outfits to be work in the morning after rising, at early afternoon, and in the evening. Sara Jane Richter’s Speakers Bureau presentation explores why these women endured such restrictive and sometimes deadly clothing, as well as the elements, purpose, and the proper way to put it all on. Friday, June 3 at 1:30 PM at the National Orphan Train Complex and Research Center. Details here.

Manhattan: Throw Like a Girl

Many female athletes in Kansas have fascinating tales of perseverance, hard work, and success on levels where they were previously barred from competition. Margaret Thompson Murdock of Berryton competed in the 1976 Olympics as the first women to represent the United States in a shooting competition. Kendra Wecker, a native of Marysville, made headlines when at age 12 she became the first girl to reach the finals of the NFL’s Punt, Pass, & Kick competition. Laura Hartley’s Speakers Bureau presentation explores the landscape for women athletes before and after Title IX legislation and how opportunities for women have impacted sports in our country. Saturday, June 4 at 2:45 PM at the Four Points Sheraton. Sponsored by Business & Professional Women of Kansas. Details here.

Wichita: Outdoor Wildlife Learning Site

The Mid-America All-Indian Center & Museum marks the opening of the Outdoor Wildlife Learning Site with presentations about Kansas ecology and early inhabitants. The interpretive signage project connecting ecological and botanical elements with the culture and history of American Indians is supported by a KHC Humanities grant. Speakers include Kelly Kindscher, Kansas Biological Survey; Katie Sparks, KU Biodiversity Institute; and Gloria McSpadden-Streib, tribal elder. Saturday, June 4 at 1:00 PM. Details here.

Chanute & Wathena: Sharing Patterns, Sharing Lives

In the early 20th century, Emporia was home to a group of innovative quilters that included Rose Kretsinger, Charlotte Whitehill, and Hannah Haynes Headlee. Today their quilts are housed in art museums and revered internationally. In the Speakers Bureau presentation, Deborah Divine discusses Kansas quilts from this time period and the unique collaborations that sparked “the Emporia, Kansas phenomenon” and some of the finest quilts of the 20th century. Following a brief lecture and discussion, participants will make a Kretsinger-inspired quilt square of their own. Monday, June 6 at 6:30 PM at First Methodist Church. Sponsored by the Chanute Public Library. Details here. Thursday, June 9 at 6:30 PM at Wathena Branch, Doniphan Co. Library District 1. Details here.

Oberlin: A Scattered People: An American Family Moves West

Gerald McFarland offers a vivid, personal history of five generations of his family who migrated west over the course of two centuries. Their struggles, successes, and causes (one relative was John Brown) mirror our country’s history and dreams. Gene T. Chávez leads this TALK book discussion at Oberlin City Library on June 7 at 6:30 PM. Details here.

Many more humanities events are happening this summer. Visit the KHC Calendar of Events for more information.