Humanities Happenings 5/20-5/22

City Drug Store, Fredonia, 1930s. kansasmemory.org, Kansas Historical Society, Copy and Reuse Restrictions Apply.

Cindy Higgins talks about the glory days of the soda fountain this Saturday in Greensburg. Pictured: City Drug Store, Fredonia, 1930s. kansasmemory.org, Kansas Historical Society, Copy and Reuse Restrictions Apply.

This almost-summer weekend features events covering classic summertime topics like baseball and soda fountains, plus cowboys and Thomas Hardy. Explore this weekend’s Humanities Happenings:

Garden City: Far From the Madding Crowd

Gabriel Oak watches Bathsheba, the impulsive young mistress of Weatherby Farm, enter into an unhappy marriage — as unaware as she that fate will finally bring them together. Jennifer Jo Krisuk leads a TALK book discussion of Thomas Hardy’s classic novel on Saturday, May 21 at 11:00 AM at Finney County Public Library. Details here.

Dodge City: Cowboys and Clerics

In the days when Wild Bill Hickok might ride his horse into your church service — it happened in Junction City — the life of a minister was a rowdy affair. John Burchill’s Speakers Bureau presentation looks into the early years of Kansas clergy and the colorful characters that made up our early faith communities, such as Pastor Gay of Mulvane who faced a gunman in church — and then converted him. Saturday, May 21 at 2:00 PM at Boot Hill Museum. Details here.

Greensburg: Soda Fountains of Kansas

Relive the glory days of the soda fountain where tonics and curatives evolved into refreshments like the Brown Cow, the Mudslide, and the Egg Cream. Government regulations, World War I luxury taxes, and bottled soda pop prompted Kansas pharmacists to make more ice cream concoctions and add food to keep their evolving fountain sideline businesses profitable. Cindy Higgins’ Speakers Bureau presentation also explores soda fountains in Kansas today and their revival throughout the nation. Saturday, May 21 at 3:00 PM at Kiowa County Historical Museum & Soda Fountain. Details here. 

Junction City: The Kansas City Monarchs in Our Hometown

Formed in 1922, the Kansas City Monarchs revolutionized baseball: not only were they charter members of the Negro National League and the first professional team to use outdoor lighting, the Monarchs sent more players to the major leagues than any other Negro League franchise. Phil S. Dixon’s Speakers Bureau presentation explores the exciting early barnstorming days of the Monarchs, highlights great players such as Wilber “Bullet” Rogan, Satchel Paige, and Jackie Robinson who were wore the uniform, and connects the spirit of the Monarchs to the many Kansas communities in which they played. Sunday, May 22 at 1:30 PM at Dorothy Bramlage Public Library. Details here.

Find more Humanities events on KHC’s Calendar of Events.

Topeka Gives 2016

topeka_gives

“There were quite a few in our group who lived in this time period and I was appreciative of the discussion leader for letting them share their own experiences. It was like a history lesson and a book discussion all in one, and it was special.”  — Coordinator at Aldersgate Village after discussing Snow Falling on Cedars

Since 1997, the Kansas Humanities Council has supported 194 Talk About Literature in Kansas (TALK) book discussions at Topeka senior living facilities. KHC provides the books and the discussion leaders, while readers provide the conversation.

Will you support TALK programs in Topeka
during Topeka Gives on June 7?

The Topeka Community Foundation will “match your gift”
on this one day only.

Research shows that access to high-quality learning opportunities, like book discussions, is critical to healthy aging:

  • Adults with active minds are less likely to suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and other health ailments.
  • Frequent cognitive activity slows down cognitive decline.
  • Adults need opportunities to meet new companions after leaving the workforce or home.

Aging Well, “Learning for a Lifetime” (July/August 2009)

Let’s Keep Topekans TALK-ing!
Donate to the Kansas Humanities Council during Topeka Gives

Please stop by Fairlawn Plaza Mall, 21st and Fairlawn in Topeka, on June 7th between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. to make your donation. Click here to download the giving form or pick one up at the event.

Your contribution to the Kansas Humanities Council at Topeka Gives will support future TALK book discussions at Topeka’s senior living facilities. KHC needs your support to keep these programs free and available to those who need them. Thank you!

Can’t make it to Topeka Gives?

Click here to make an online donation (donations made online will not be matched by the Topeka Community Foundation).

Topeka StoryCorps: Darren Canady and Madison Wallace

In 2014, StoryCorps came to Topeka to document stories that explore the 60-year impact of Brown v. Topeka Board of Education, the landmark supreme court case that desegregated public schools. Darren Canady and Madison Wallace compare their high school experiences in Topeka.

Topeka StoryCorps was supported by the Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site, the Kansas Humanities Council, Kansas Public Radio, and the Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library in commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Brown v. Board decision.

Topeka StoryCorps: Linda Jeffrey and Randolph Jeffrey

In 2014, StoryCorps came to Topeka to document stories that explore the 60-year impact of Brown v. Topeka Board of Education, the landmark Supreme Court case that desegregated public schools. Randolph Jeffrey interviews his sister Linda about her educational experience in Topeka in the 1960s and her experience working as a lawyer in Kansas.

Topeka StoryCorps was supported by Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site, Kansas Humanities Council, Kansas Public Radio, and the Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library in commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Brown v. Board decision.

Topeka StoryCorps: Christel Marquardt and Joel Marquardt

In 2014, StoryCorps came to Topeka to document stories that explore the 60-year impact of Brown v. Board Board of Education, the landmark Supreme Court case that desegregated public schools. Joel Marquardt shares his experiences attending Topeka High and his mother Christel shares how her upbringing shaped the way she raised her own children.

Topeka StoryCorps was supported by Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site, Kansas Humanities Council, Kansas Public Radio, and the Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library in commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Brown v. Board decision.

Topeka StoryCorps: Maxine and Melvin Patterson

In 2014, StoryCorps came to Topeka to document stories that explore the 60-year impact of Brown v. Board Board of Education, the landmark Supreme Court case that desegregated public schools. Maxine Patterson interviews Melvin Patterson about their experiences attending the Kansas Technical Institute (KTI), an African-American vocational school in Topeka regarded as the “Tuskegee of the West” until its closure in the 1950s.

Topeka StoryCorps was supported by Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site, Kansas Humanities Council, Kansas Public Radio, and the Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library in commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Brown v. Board decision.

Topeka StoryCorps: Adrian Pearson and Donna Rae Pearson

In 2014, StoryCorps came to Topeka to document stories that explore the 60-year impact of Brown v. Board Board of Education, the landmark Supreme Court case that desegregated public schools. Adrian Pearson talks with his mother Donna Rae Pearson about what it was like growing up in a predominantly white rural area and then transferring to high school in Topeka.

Topeka StoryCorps was supported by Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site, Kansas Humanities Council, Kansas Public Radio, and the Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library in commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Brown v. Board decision.

Topeka StoryCorps: Duane Pomeroy and Janel Johnson

In 2014, StoryCorps came to Topeka to document stories that explore the 60-year impact of Brown v. Board Board of Education, the landmark Supreme Court case that desegregated public schools. Duane Pomeroy, former USD 501 school board member, interviews Janel Johnson, current USD 501 School Board President, about their roles as School Board Presidents. As a newly elected member in the 1980s, Pomeroy was listed as the defendant in a class action lawsuit against the district for failure to comply with the requirements of Brown v. Board.

Topeka StoryCorps was supported by Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site, Kansas Humanities Council, Kansas Public Radio, and the Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library  in commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Brown v. Board decision.

Help Shape the KHC Grants Program

UPDATE: As of Monday, May 16th, we’ve reached our goal for the grants survey. Thank you for your interest in helping shape the KHC grants program.

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We need your input!

The Kansas Humanities Council is exploring changes to the grants program. Please help us by answering 10 quick questions. The survey should take no longer than 10 minutes.

Thank you.

Humanities Happenings 5/6-5/8

PrintTraveling on the Kansas Turnpike between Topeka and Wichita this weekend? Be sure to take in one — or all — of three great humanities events along the way.

Emporia: La Colonia de Emporia: Stories of the Latino Community

The Lyon County History Center’s new exhibition explores the history of Emporia’s Latino community through first-person stories. The exhibition is part of Latino Americans: 500 Years of History. The opening reception is Friday, May 6 at 6:00 PM and the exhibition runs through June 30. Details here.

Matfield Green: Poet Laureate of Kansas

Poet Laureate of Kansas™ Eric McHenry present a reading and discussion about poetry on Saturday, May 7 at 1:30 PM at Pioneer Bluffs. Details here.

Wichita: Freedom to Expand: Gordon Parks

It’s your last weekend to see two exhibitions at the Wichita Art Museum: “Gordon Parks: Back to Fort Scott” and “Freedom Now: Photographs of the Civil Rights Struggle.” Both exhibitions feature the work of Kansas-native Gordon Parks and are supported by a KHC Humanities grant. Details here.