Humanities Happenings: 09/18-09/20

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This has to be some kind of record! This weekend’s calendar is full of nearly a dozen humanities events!

North Newton: “From Football to Futbol”
The rise of the 2003 Garden City High School soccer team reflected demographic shifts in western Kansas. Join filmmaker Marlo Angell in a screening of her documentary, “From Football to Futbol,” followed by a discussion about the many ways immigration is changing sports and communities in Kansas today. Film running time is 15:42. Produced by Justicia, Inc. and Via Dolorosa Films. This event supports “Root for the Home Team: Building Community Through Sports” a “Hometown Teams” partner site exhibit sponsored by Bethel College. September 18th at Bethel College at 11:00am. Click here for details.

Lansing: Print & Patriotism
When the United States entered World War I in the spring of 1917, the civilian population was aware of the high casualty rates from trench warfare and the resulting low morale. It was necessary to inspire and inform people in ways that were both heroic and practical. Lorraine Madway, Speakers Bureau, will highlight posters, pamphlets, and sheet music that encouraged Americans to buy Liberty Bonds; raise, conserve, and send food to Europe; and promote the importance of books and libraries as a vital component of democracy. September 19th at Lansing Historical Museum at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

Augusta: Great Expectations
In Charles Dickens’ classic novel, orphaned Pip cultivates the rich Mrs. Havisham and beautifut Estella, and dreams that some day he’ll become a gentleman. An escaped convict threatens to shatter his dreams – or are his adventures just beginning? 525 pp. This book is from the TALK series, “British Classics.” TALK book discussion led by Dennis Etzel, Jr. September 19th at Augusta Public Library at 10:30am. Click here for details.

Overland Park: Viegos Amigos
Balo, Ricardo, Domingo and Kike have been friends since the day they were born eight decades ago in Peru’s El Callao neighborhood. In Viegos Amigos (Good Old Boys), fate delivers a cruel blow when Kike dies on the eve of the game that could lead their favorite soccer team to first place in the league. The now trio decides to steal Kike’s ashes and take them to the match, stopping first at some of their favorite youthful hangouts for one last hurrah. Karen Diaz Anchante, Assistant Professor of Modern Languages at Washburn University, leads the film discussion. The screening and discussion are part of the Latin American Cinema Festival XXIV, which features weekly films with topics that encourage a better understanding of Latino culture and traditions. Each film is introduced and discussed by a humanities scholar. All discussions are bilingual. Sponsored by Sociedad Hidalgo, Inc. September 19th at Rio Theatre at 11:00am. Click here for details.

Leavenworth: Poet Laureate of Kansas™ Presentation
The Poet Laureate of Kansas promotes the humanities as a public resource for all Kansans with readings and discussions about poetry in communities across the state. Eric McHenry of Lawrence is the 2015-2017 Poet Laureate of Kansas. A nationally known poet and Associate Professor of English at Washburn University, his work has been featured in publications such as Poetry International, Slate, Yale Review, and Topeka Magazine, among many others. A fifth-generation Topeka native, Eric has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize for poetry seven times and received the Theodore Roethke Prize in 2011. His first book of poems, Potscrubber Lullabies, earned him the prestigious Kate Tufts Discovery Award in 2007, the largest American prize for a first book of poetry. September 19th at Leavenworth Public Library. Click here for details.

Wellington: Harvey Girls
The Fred Harvey Company not only hired recent immigrants to work in their famous Harvey House restaurants, they actively recruited them. Eventually African-American workers became a part of the workforce, and during World War II American Indians and Mexican Americans were hired as well. This restaurant work along the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe railroad lines provided reputable work for women who had few choices in the workforce. Michaeline Chance-Reay, Speakers Bureau, will explore the job duties and working conditions of Harvey Girls from 1876 to the early 1950s. September 19th at Wellington Public Library at 1:00pm. Click here for details. 

Topeka: “VOICES & VISIONS: A Socio-Historical Perspective”
A panel of scholars examine issues raised in “Visions of Right,” a theatrical performance that explores personal identity, ethics, and tolerance. Moderated by Tom Prasch, Professor of History at Washburn University. The discussion immediately follows a 7:30 pm performance of “Visions of Right.” Panel discussion is free and open to the public. This event is part of “VOICES AND VISIONS: A Community Discussion Inspired by VISIONS OF RIGHT,” a series of public programs that examine the social issues connected to the play. Sponsored by Ad Astra Theatre Ensemble. September 19th at Warehouse 414 at 9:30pm. Click here for details.

Perry: “The Common & Quirky Mascots of Kansas”
They come in all shapes, sizes, and colors and are some of the most recognizable characters of our state: the mascots of Kansas! From the most recognizable, like the KU Jayhawk and the K-State Wildcat, to the more obscure Fowler High School Goldbugs and the Hill City Ringnecks, Jordan Poland, Speakers Bureau, discusses the history and pageantry of Kansas mascots. Explore with us the unique, historical ties that many sports mascots have to their communities before playing the state’s newest and greatest trivia game, “Name that Kansas Mascot!” Sponsored by Perry Pride. September 20th at Highland Community College, Perry Center at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

Topeka: Mama Day
Gloria Naylor’s book is set on the Georgia sea island of Willow Springs, where people still use only herbal medicine and honor ancestors who came over as slaves. Matriarch Mama Day, who can call up lightning storms and see secrets in her dreams, tests her powers when her great-niece, a stubbornly emancipated woman, finds her life and soul in danger from the island’s darker forces. 311 pp. This book is from the TALK series, “Community: The Way We Live.” TALK book discussion led by Thomas Prasch. September 20th at Aldersgate Village at 3:00pm. Click here for details.

Independence: Preservation Project
The public is invited to the opening of a special exhibit that features photographs and material from veterans who served with the 1011th Quartermaster Company, US Army Reserve, during deployments to Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan. This exhibit supports “The 1011th -A Story of Service Throughout the Years,” a project to collect and preserve the images of veterans. Funding is provided by KHC’s “The Things They Carried Home” grants initiative, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Standing Together initiative. Sponsored by RSVP Four County. September 20th at Independence Historical Museum and Art Center at 1:30pm. Click here for details.

Topeka: “VOICES & VISIONS: An Artist’s Perspective”
A panel of scholars examine issues raised in “Visions of Right,” a theatrical performance that explores personal identity, ethics, and tolerance. Moderated by Marguerite Perret, Professor of Art at Washburn University. The discussion immediately follows a 2:00pm performance of “Visions of Right.” Panel discussion is free and open to the public. This event is part of “VOICES AND VISIONS: A Community Discussion Inspired by VISIONS OF RIGHT,” a series of public programs that examine the social issues connected to the play. Sponsored by Ad Astra Theatre Ensemble. September 20th at Warehouse 414 at 4:00pm. Click here for details.

Keep up with upcoming KHC-supported events by visiting our calendar.