Hello from Tajikistan

tajikistan

 

Hello from Tajikistan! We’ve traveled an amazing distance of 8,414 miles from Goodland, Kansas, to Central Asia. Mountainous Tajikistan is a destination for climbers, hikers, skiers, and adventure sports fans. We’re enjoying the scenery and we’re also enjoying learning about the country’s sports culture and heroes, including Mavzuna Chorieva, Tajikistan’s “Million Dollar Baby,” who became a role model for young women when she took home a bronze medal — the country’s only medal — in women’s lightweight boxing at the 2012 Olympics.

It seems unbelievable that we’ve walked 8,414 miles, but what’s even more unbelievable is that we’re not done yet! So, keep walking — every lunchtime walk, every daily pedometer count, and every community exercise session helps us reach our goal of walking around the world.

Click here to download a Walking Scorecard to track your steps or minutes exercised. You can even pick up a pedometer to count your steps at the Hometown Teams Smithsonian exhibition in Atchison (on display through August 9), Perry, and Humboldt, and at participating Hometown Teams partner sites.

Where will we go next week? Follow KHC’s walking progress on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest for most Postcards from the Road.

Now, There’s An Idea!

Grant ideas Canva 2

The draft deadline for fall Humanities and Heritage grants is August 26th, and the final grants deadline is September 30th. If you’ve been thinking of applying for a KHC grant, but need inspiration or ideas, here is a roundup of articles about recent KHC-supported grant projects. Happy grant writing!

Humanities Grants

Humanities Grants support projects that engage the public with the humanities. Funding is available for the creation of short documentary films, lecture series, museum exhibitions, and other humanities events. Click on the links to learn more about Humanities grant projects.

Heritage Grants

Heritage Grants are intended to support projects that preserve and interpret local historical and cultural resources. Funding is available for oral history and research projects, collections care, and photograph digitization. Click on the links to learn more about Heritage grant projects.

Has this blog post sparked a project idea? Click here or contact Murl Riedel, Director of Grants, at murl(at)kansashumanities.org to get started. You can also find more “grants-piration” — plus information about upcoming deadlines — by subscribing to KHC E-News.

Humanities Happenings: 07/31-08/02

Image courtesy of Watkins Museum of History.

Image courtesy of Watkins Museum of History.

A sweet treat in Lawrence, and “Hometown Teams” exhibits in Atchison, Wichita, Larned, & Eudora.

Lawrence: Sweet Remedies
Relive the glory days of the soda fountain where tonics and curatives evolved into refreshments like the Brown Cow, the Mudslide, and the Egg Cream. Government regulations, World War I luxury taxes, and bottled soda pop prompted Kansas pharmacists to make more ice cream concoctions and add food to keep their evolving fountain sideline business profitable. Cindy Higgins, Speakers Bureau, also explores soda fountains in Kansas today and the revival of soda fountains throughout the nation. July 31st at Watkins Museum of History at 7:00pm. Click here for details.

Atchison: “Hometown Teams” Host
Experience the story of sports — the athletes, the coaches, and the fans who cheer them on — in “Hometown Teams,” a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition. Get up close to memorable artifacts and view over 200 photographs highlighting Americans and their love of sports. Get into the game with “Minute for Movement” sports-inspired exercise stations designed to get you moving. Also on display is Atchison’s companion exhibition, “Team Colors: Wearing Our Hearts on Our Sleeves, Caps and Coats.” Both exhibits are on display through August 9th at Atchison County Historical Society. Click here for details.

Wichita: Lions & Tigers & Bears, Oh My!
This “Hometown Teams” partner site exhibition explores the cultural significance of team mascots in sports, including the use of Native American imagery. The project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. Exhibit is on display through August 31st at the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame. Click here for details.

Larned: From Survival to Sport
This “Hometown Teams” partner site exhibition examines how hunting transitioned from a survival necessity to a leisure sport enjoyed by cavalry officers and their wives. Exhibit is on display through November 1st at Fort Larned National Historic Site. Click here for details.

Eudora: Comeback Kids
This “Hometown Teams” partner site exhibition documents the rise of high school football in Eudora. From scoreless seasons in the 1940s to league champions in 2012, the team’s success gave confidence to a developing community. Exhibit is on display through September 27th at Eudora Community Museum. Click here for details. 

To learn about upcoming KHC-supported events, please visit our calendar.

Fandemonium

This year, KHC features weekly posts related to the Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition Hometown Teams, currently touring Kansas.

Fans of Sporting KC, Kansas City's Major League Soccer team, cheer for their team in good times and bad.  Image Courtesy Lawrence Journal-World Photos.

Fans of Sporting KC, Kansas City’s Major League Soccer team, cheer for their team in good times and bad. Image Courtesy Lawrence Journal-World Photos.

He had the goaltender beat.

In the 2013 Major League Soccer Championship game, headed into the tenth round of the shootout, Real Salt Lake defender Lovel Palmer kicked straight ahead, but Sporting KC goalie Jimmy Nielsen dove left.

It should have been a tying shot, setting up another round of the shootout and giving Salt Lake a chance to stay in the game. But instead Sporting KC got some help from the top goalpost, which clipped the ball as it rose and rebounded it out of the net.

With that, Sporting KC won the 2013 MLS Cup for the first time since moving to their new home, Sporting Park in Kansas City, Kansas. And they did it in front of the same home crowd that regularly packs the stands throughout the season, often selling out the nearly 18,500-seat stadium.

Despite some ups and down in the team’s record over the years, its fan base has grown steadily. And it’s the fan culture that defines Sporting KC soccer as much as anything that happens on the field.

The Members Stand at Sporting Park is known as “The Cauldron,” a holdover from Sporting KC’s past as the Kansas City Wizards. Located under a banner that reads “Welcome to the Blue Hell,” supporters in this section are the most enthusiastic and vocal fans at the game, chanting, singing and always, always standing.

Sporting KC boasts several independent supporters’ groups in its North and South Stands, women and men who come together on game days to tailgate before first kick and cheer between whistles. These groups also sponsor watch parties, pick-up games and philanthropy events in their quest to spread the love of the game.

And on December 7, 2013, as the crowd erupted into roars of victory and fireworks exploded in the sky, Sporting fans received the ultimate reward for their devotion: a MLS Cup won at home.

Hello from Baku

baku

Hello from Azerbaijan! Together, Kansans have walked 7,409 miles from Goodland, Kansas, to the former Soviet republic on the Caspian Sea. The 12th-century Maiden Tower is one of the sites we’ll see in the capital city of Baku. It’s an exciting time to visit. The city is still buzzing from June’s European Games when thousands of Olympic-level athletes from 50 countries traveled to Baku to compete. Azerbaijan ranked second in the medal count, just behind Russia.

We’ve come a long way, but we’re still going. By counting our steps, Kansans are well on our way to circling the globe. We still need your help. Click here to download a Walking Scorecard to track your steps or minutes exercised. You can even pick up a pedometer to count your steps at the Hometown Teams Smithsonian exhibition in Atchison (on display through August 9), Perry, and Humboldt, and at participating Hometown Teams partner sites.

Where will we go next week? Follow KHC’s walking progress on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest for most Postcards from the Road.

Humanities Happenings: 07/24-07/26

This 1911 Joe Tinker baseball card was printed just a few seasons after Tinker helped the Chicago Cubs win back-to-back World Series.  Image Courtesy Benjamin K. Edwards Collection, via Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

This 1911 Joe Tinker baseball card was printed just a few seasons after Tinker helped the Chicago Cubs win back-to-back World Series. Image Courtesy Benjamin K. Edwards Collection, via Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Muscotah, Holton, and four other Kansas communities are ready to help you make the most of the dog days of summer.

Great Bend: The Mighty Ducks
In this 1992 film, a self-centered lawyer is sentenced to community service coaching a rag- tag youth hockey team. This event supports “Argonne Rebels Drum & Bugle Corps,” a “Hometown Teams” partner site exhibit that tells the story of a competitive drum and bugle corps established in Great Bend in the 1940s, on display through August 31st. July 24th at Great Bend Public Library at 3:00pm. Click here for details.

La Cygne: Young Historian Night
See young adults perform their interpretation of historical figures with a sports connection. The performances are the result of mentored workshops that focus on historical research. This event supports “What Binds Our Community Together? It’s Hometown Teams!,” a “Hometown Teams” partner site exhibit, on display through December 31st. July 24th at La Cygne Historical Society at 5:00pm. Click here for details.

Kansas City: Riverkings
Barbara Higgins-Dover, Director of the Kansas Riverkings Museum, presents public programs in Leavenworth, Kansas City, Topeka, and Lawrence that explore the history of commercial fishing and fish markets along the Kansas and Missouri Rivers. July 24th at Mad Jack’s Fresh Fish Market & Restaurant at 3:00pm. Click here for details.

Blue Rapids: Heavy Hitters
Formed in 1920, the Kansas City Monarchs revolutionized baseball: not only were they charter members of the Negro National League and the first professional team to use outdoor lighting, the Monarchs also sent more players to the major leagues than any other Negro League franchise. Phil S. Dixon, Speakers Bureau, explores the exciting early barnstorming days of the Monarchs, highlights great players such as Wilber “Bullet” Rogan, Satchel Paige, and Jackie Robinson who wore the uniform, and connects the spirit of the Monarchs to the many Kansas communities in which they played.  July 25th at Blue Rapids Historical Society at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

Holton: Reciples & Reflections
Community cookbooks have carried the stories of Kansas women over the years, sharing sentiments of home, family, and faith. Louise M. Hanson, Speakers Bureau, provides a survey of Kansas cookbooks from 1874 to the present, which reveal not only changes in foodways but also poems, prayers, personal reflections, and histories. These humble publications show that food, home, community, and faith were the foundation upon which Kansas women constructed their lives. July 25th at Jackson County Historical Society at 12:30pm. Click here for details.

Muscotah: Joe Tinker Day
Spend Joe Tinker Day in Muscotah! The Hall of Famer’s hometown plays host to a vintage baseball showdown between the Topeka Westerns and the Lincoln Olympic Vintage Baseball Club. Sponsored by Atchison County Historical Society, this event is part of the “Hometown Teams” Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition, on display in Atchsion through August 9th. July 25th at Joe Tinker Field at 12:00pm. Click here for details.

For information on upcoming KHC-supported events, visit our calendar.

Call for 2016-2017 Speakers Bureau Proposals

SB collage

Deadline: Friday, August 21, 2015

Click here for the RFP.

KHC is seeking proposals for Speakers Bureau-style presentations that engage Kansas audiences with the humanities.

The 2016-2017 Speakers Bureau catalog will feature topics that explore ideas and research related to The Common Good–democratic citizenship, water and land use, changing demographics, and folklife traditions, among other topics. KHC scholars are respected for their knowledge of their topic, humanities perspective, public service, and ability to answer questions through scholarship and experience.

For more information, contact Leslie Von Holten, director of programs, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org.

Running Right into the History Books

This year, KHC features weekly posts related to the Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition Hometown Teams, currently touring Kansas.

Billy Mills's come-from-behind victory in the 10,000 meters is still considered one of the greatest Olympic upsets of all time. Photo courtesy of Kansas Athletics, Inc.

Billy Mills’s come-from-behind victory in the 10,000 meters is still considered one of the greatest Olympic upsets of all time. Photo courtesy of Kansas Athletics, Inc.

As the runners pulled into the last stretch of the 10,000 meters in the 1964 Olympics, all eyes were on Australian Ron Clarke, who held the world record in the event and was heavily favored to win.

Then came Billy Mills, veering in from the fourth lane and sprinting past Clarke and the other top contenders to take gold—a feat no American had ever accomplished in the 10,000 meters, and which hasn’t been repeated since.

Although not from Kansas originally, Mills’s connections to the state are strong. He began running while attending the Haskell Institute (now the Haskell Indian Nations University) in Lawrence and later attended the University of Kansas on an athletic scholarship, where he excelled both as an individual runner and as a member of the 1959 and 1960 national championship outdoor track teams.

Mills’s stunning Olympics victory cemented his place in Kansas sports history, and he has since used that fame to promote health initiatives to reduce rates of diabetes among Native Americans. Only the second Native American to win an Olympic gold medal—the first was the great Jim Thorpe—Mills is devoted to giving back to Native American communities. Recently, he partnered with the Kickapoo Nation located near Horton to break ground on the Billy Mills Kickapoo Tribe Cross Country Park. Kickapoo tribal chairman Steve Cadue met Mills in 1965, when he watched Mills compete in Germany the year after Mills won his medal.

A fun fact: Mills’s underdog Olympics triumph was so unexpected that one of the American television commentators barely seemed to notice it happening. His fellow commentator, however, definitely noticed: “Look at Mills! Look at Mills!” he shouted enthusiastically as Mills passed silver medalist Mohammed Gammoudi and eventual bronze medalist Clarke.  You can watch a clip of the historic moment here.

Hello from Istanbul

 

ISTANBUL

Hello from Istanbul! Together, we have walked 6,311 miles from Goodland, Kansas, to the largest city in Turkey. The historic Blue Mosque, built in the 17th century and so named for its interior blue tiles, greets us as we continue our quest to walk around the globe in honor of the Hometown Teams Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition. Speaking of sports, the other sound that greets us in Istanbul is the sound of sports fans cheering. What sports are big in Istanbul? The increasingly popular basketball joins football (soccer) as the favorite sports to watch and play.

Want to help KHC walk around the world? You can! Add your steps to our total count and help us reach our goal. Click here to download a Walking Scorecard to track your steps or minutes exercised. You can even pick up a pedometer to count your steps at the Hometown Teams Smithsonian exhibition in Atchison (on display through August 9), Perry, and Humboldt, and at participating Hometown Teams partner sites.

Where will we go next week? Follow KHC’s walking progress on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest for most Postcards from the Road.

Humanities Happenings: 07/17-07/19

Photo courtesy of Anderson McConnell

Film still from “When the Well Runs Dry.” Image courtesy of Steven Lerner.

Small towns, big events! Check out KHC-supported events in Florence, Marysville, and more.

Cottonwood Falls: College (1927)
Starring Buster Keaton, College (1927) is a comedy that follows a bookish college student as he tries to become a athlete in order to impress a girl. The film features sports and uniforms from the 1920s. Prior to the feature film, participants will view “One Run Elmer,” a short film that features Buster Keaton and Jim Thorpe, a Kansan that played professional football in the 1920s. Derrick Doty, a local film historian, will provide introductions to “One Run Elmer” and College. This event supports “Chase County: A League of Our Own,” a “Hometown Teams” partner site exhibit on display through November 4th that explores the baseball tradition in Chase County. July 18th at Chase County Historical Society at 1:00pm. Click here for details.

Florence: “When the Well Runs Dry”
The public is invited to the premiere screening of “When the Well Runs Dry,” a documentary short film that explores water resources in Kansas through the stories and experiences of Florence residents. After the premiere, learn more about the film from a panel of scholars and film participants. Panel will be moderated by Tom Averill, English Professor at Washburn University. July 18th at Masonic Lodge at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

Marysville: Community and Cultural Opportunity
Woven together over the years, humanities opportunities allowed one rural Kansas town to stretch beyond its own place and time. Struggling Glasco (pop. 498) was told that their town had no future, but residents pushed back by organizing events and hosting cultural opportunities. Joan Nothern, Speakers Bureau, will lead you through their journey from Chautauqua to exhibits and special projects, lectures and book discussions, that strengthened the community and enabled small but mighty Glasco to become a facilitating agent beyond its own city limits. July 18th at Marysville Public Library at 10:00am. Click here for details.

Leavenworth: Riverkings and Fish Tales
Barbara Higgins-Dover, Director of the Kansas Riverkings Museum, leads public programs in Leavenworth, Kansas City, Topeka, and Lawrence that explore the history of commercial fishing and fish markets along the Kansas and Missouri Rivers. July 18th at Leavenworth County Historical Society at 3:00pm. Click here for details.

North Newton: Service on the Homefront
Few people were as unprepared for World War I as Kansas Mennonites. Opposed to military service for religious reasons, these mostly German farmers came under suspicion, and many were incarcerated at Fort Riley for the remainder of the war. Later, with World War II looming, the Mennonites–along with Quaker and Brethren churches–proposed a system for alternative service. The result was Civilian Public Service, which assigned many Kansas conscientious objectors to domestic work projects, particularly in mental health hospitals. Aaron Barnhart, Speakers Bureau, explains how CPS workers helped expose intolerable conditions at these institutions, leading to postwar reforms and a transformation of psychiatric care. July 19th at Kauffman Museum at 3:00pm. Click here for details.

For more information about KHC-supported events, visit our calendar.