KHC Receives “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” Grant

Print

KHC has been selected to receive a competitive Latino Americans: 500 Years of History grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the American Library Association (ALA).

As one of 203 grant recipients selected from across the country, KHC will receive a grant of $10,000 to support projects at four partner organizations: Dodge City Public Library; Harvey County Historical Museum, Newton; Lyon County Historical Society, Emporia; and Johnson County Community College, Overland Park. Funding through KHC will enable partner organizations to explore local stories of Latino history and culture with film discussions, oral histories, and other complementary programming.

The initiative also features the six-part, NEH-supported documentary film Latino Americans, created for PBS in 2013 by the WETA public television station. The award-winning series chronicles the history of Latinos in the United States from the 16th century to present day.

“The ALA’s Latino Americans: 500 Years of History project is an opportunity for all Kansans to learn more about the state’s large and diverse Latino populations,” said Julie Mulvihill, Executive Director. “The Kansas Humanities Council is looking forward to sharing these unique stories about Latino life in Kansas, both past and present.”

The Latino Americans: 500 Years of History grantees represent 42 states and the District of Columbia, and include 78 public libraries, 68 college/university libraries and organizations, 19 community college libraries, 10 state humanities councils, 12 museums and a range of other nonprofit organizations. View a full list of the recipients. Latino Americans: 500 Years of History is part of an NEH initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square.

For more information, contact Murl Riedel, Director of Grants, at murl@kansashumanities.org.

To read the Spanish-language press release about Latino Americans: 500 Years of History, please click here.

This project is supported by the Kansas Humanities Council. Latino Americans: 500 Years of History has been made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the American Library Association (ALA). It is part of the NEH initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square.

KHC Awards Seven Summer Grants

Hoxie schoolchildren pose for a class photo. Photo courtesy of Sheridan County Historical Society.

Hoxie schoolchildren pose for a class photo. Photo courtesy of Sheridan County Historical Society.

KHC recently awarded $44,398 in Humanities and Heritage grants to seven organizations. Local contributions to the projects are estimated at $179,698. 

Sheridan County Historical Society, Hoxie ($3,209) 
Sheridan County Historical Society Photo Preservation Project
A project to preserve, catalog, and index approximately 2,500 school and alumni photographs from Northwest Kansas in the 19th and 20th centuries. Jan Moore, project director. 

Lucas Arts & Humanities Council ($3,485) 
Digitizing Kansas Grassroots Art Environment Videos
A preservation project to transfer and digitally store thirty uncut video tapes featuring Kansas folk artists working in their home environments. Peter Max Lawrence, project director.
 

Rice County Historical Society, Lyons ($3,269) 
Agricultural Choices
An oral history project to gather interviews from local farmers and their relatives about the decisions they make while working in agriculture. Interviews will be featured in an upcoming museum exhibit. Charlene Akers, project director. 

United Way of the Plain, Wichita ($10,000)
Dirty Paws: Homelessness, Companionship and Identity in Wichita, Kansas
An ethnographic short film that centers on the relationship between homeless individuals and their pets in Wichita. A film screening and panel discussion are planned. Sarah Taylor, project director.

Flint Hills Discovery Center Foundation, Manhattan ($10,000) 
Tallgrass Prairie Preserve: A Flint Hills Love Story
A documentary film that focuses on the historical, environmental, and social significance of the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve in Chase County. Dave Kendall, project director. 
 

Sociedad Hidalgo, Inc., Shawnee ($5,000) 
Latin American Cinema Festival XXIV
A bilingual film festival that features five films and discussions that highlight Latin American culture. Gloria Bessenbacher, project director. 

Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita ($9,435)
Postdate: Photography and Inherited History of India
A museum exhibition and series of public programs exploring the 1947 partition of India. Jana Durfee, project director.

To find out more about KHC’s Heritage and Humanities grants, click here.

The Pitch of the Litter

This year, KHC features weekly posts related to the Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition Hometown Teams, currently touring Kansas.

Soldiers and civilians played horseshoes side by side in Lawrence, Kansas.  Image courtesy of KansasMemory, Kansas Historical Society, Copy and Reuse Restrictions Apply.

Soldiers and civilians played horseshoes side by side in Lawrence, Kansas. Image courtesy of KansasMemory, Kansas Historical Society, Copy and Reuse Restrictions Apply.

Whether you had regulation equipment or a stick shoved into the dirt, chances are that you’ve played horseshoes at some point in your life.

But did you know that some of the biggest developments in the sport have taken place right here in Kansas?

Back in 1909, the southeast Kansas town of Bronson hosted the first-ever world horseshoe tournament. And five years later, in 1914, Kansas City, Kansas, became home to the first governing body of horseshoe pitchers.

Kansas horseshoe pitchers will have a chance to make their mark on the sport again in July 2015, when Topeka plays host to the World Horseshoe Tournament.

With the tournament expected to draw as many as 1500 contestants from around the world, pitchers in Kansas know they’ve got an opportunity to share their love of the sport with future players and fans.

Dave Mathewson, a member of the Topeka 2015 World Horseshoe Tournament steering committee, hopes the event will grow the game in Kansas.

“Exposure to the non-horseshoe pitching part of the Kansas populations [could help] gain some interest in people that are looking for a lifetime sport,” Mathewson said.

Neil Hartwig, an 89-year-old horseshoe pitcher with the Riverside Horseshoe Club in Iola, agreed that the sport is good for players of all ages.

“It’s good exercise, but it isn’t strenuous,” Hartwig said.

A recreational player since his days in the Army, he’s pitched competitively for over a decade, and says it can be hard to get people interested when there are so many other sports opportunities out there. It’s one of the reasons he’s excited for the Topeka championship—and for the chance to compete, of course.

But while the competition is serious, with reputations and prize money at stake, the pitchers are opponents, not enemies.

“I would put comradery high on my reasons for going to the different tournaments,” Mathewson said. “Friends from all walks of life.”

Competition balanced with comradery?

That sounds like something Kansans know all about.

Update

Espn’s SportsCenter on the Road will be broadcasting live from the 2015 World Horseshoe Tournament on Saturday, July 18th. Click here for more information.

Hello from Lisbon

lisbon

Hello from Lisbon, Portugal! We’ve walked 4,705 from Goodland, Kansas, to Portugal’s largest city and the home of the Monastery of Jerónimos, a UNESCO World Heritage Site completed in 1601. We’ll play some football – that’s soccer to us Americans – before continuing on to our next stop on our virtual trek around the globe, powered by the combined step totals of visitors to the “Hometown Teams” Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition in Kansas.

Join us on our virtual trek around the globe and add your steps to the total.  Click here to download a Walking Scorecard to track your steps or minutes exercised. You can even pick up a pedometer to count your steps at the Hometown Teams Smithsonian exhibition in in Atchison (on display through August 9), Perry, and Humboldt, and at participating Hometown Teams partner sites.

Why walking? It is the best way to get moving, according to this article from the Lawrence Journal-World. The article recommends keeping a journal, like KHC’s Walking Scorecard, to track your progress and stay motivated.

What sites will we walk to in Europe? Stay tuned for next week’s post and follow KHC’s walking progress on Facebook,  Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Happy walking!

 

Humanities Happenings: 06/26-06/28

Photo courtesy of Meredith Wiggins

Lincoln School, Atchison. Photo courtesy of Meredith Wiggins.

Put on your game face and get ready for a Saturday jam-packed with KHC-supported events in Atchison, Clay Center, Blue Rapids, and more.

Great Bend: Angels in the Outfield (1994)
When a boy prays for a chance to have a family if the California Angels win the pennant, angels are assigned to make that possible. This film screening supports “Argonne Rebels Drum & Bugle Corps,” a special partner site exhibit that tells the story of a competitive drum and bugle corps established in Great Bend in the 1940s. The project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. June 26th at Great Bend Public Library at 3:00pm. Click here for details.

Atchison: “Hometown Teams” Exhibition Opening
Experience the story of sports–the athletes, the coaches, and the fans who cheer them on–in “Hometown Teams,” a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition. Get up close to memorable artifacts and view over 200 photographs highlighting Americans and their love of sports. Get into the game with “Minute for Movement” sports-inspired exercise stations designed to get you moving.

Also on display is the Atchison County Historical Society’s companion exhibition, “Team Colors: Wearing Our Hearts on Our Sleeves, Caps and Coats.” June 27th at Atchison County Historical Society. Click here for details.

Blue Rapids: “For a Day, for a Decade, for a Century”
The public is invited to the opening of “For a Day, for a Decade, for a Century,” a special partner site exhibit that features a 1913 exhibition baseball game between the Chicago White Sox and the New York Giants played in Blue Rapids.

This project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. June 27th at Blue Rapids Historical Society at 9:00am. Click here for details.

Alma: Flint Hills Photographer
Hear a panel of experts discuss the life of Otto Kratzer, a Volland business owner and amateur photographer whose work captured life in the Flint Hills community between 1905 and 1965. Learn the significance of Kratzer’s photo and film collection and hear about the lifecycle of the now-vanished town of Volland. Panel is moderated by Virgil Dean, Adjunct History Professor at Washburn University, and sponsored by Wabaunsee County Historical Society. June 27th at the Volland Store at 1:00pm. Click here for details.

Hiawatha: Preservation Workshop
This public preservation workshop will be led by Shannon Hsu, Curator of Collections at Shawnee Town 1929. The preservation workshop is aimed at helping veterans and their families preserve material related to military service. The workshop is part of “The Things They Carried Home” grants initiative, and is sponsored by Brown County Historical Society. June 27th at Morrill Public Library at 10:00am. Click here for details.

Marysville: Movement through Music
Kansas City jazz thrived on diversity: just as it melded and reshaped African and European musical traditions, it also gained energy and vitality from the talents of musicians of all races. KC’s jazz visionaries crossed social barriers and championed racial integration. Kevin Rabas, Speakers Bureau, explores how musicians such as Charlie Parker, Coleman Hawkins, and Lester Young drew national attention to the need for racial harmony by integrating KC’s black musicians union, touring with integrated bands, and writing songs that advocated equal rights in the early years of the Civil Rights movement. June 27th at Marysville Public Library at 1:00pm. Click here for details.

Concordia: “Eye Deep in Hell”
Soldiers in the trenches of World War I suffered extreme temperatures, disease, and parasites in addition to the psychological stresses of war. Larry Burke, Speakers Bureau, explores events leading to the outbreak of war, and will examine the strategies and tactics of trench warfare with special emphasis on the individuals who fought the war along the Western Front. How did the soldiers cope with the immense stress of the trenches? How did they find the courage to go “over the top” into the maelstrom of no man’s land? Many WWI trench warfare soldiers suffered from “shell shock,” a combat stress reaction similar to today’s post-traumatic stress disorder. How do the stresses of WWI relate to soldiers today? June 27th at Cloud County Historical Society Museum at 1:30pm. Click here for details.

Clay Center: Preservation Workshop
This public preservation workshop will be led by Cynthia Harris, archivist at Kansas State University‘s Hale Library. The preservation workshop is aimed at helping veterans and their families preserve material related to military service, and is a part of “The Things They Carried Home” grants initiative. Sponsored by the Solomon Valley-Hwy 24-Heritage Alliance. June 27th at Clay County Historical Society at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

Augusta: An Unlikely History
They come in all shapes, sizes, and colors and are some of the most recognizable characters of our state: the mascots of Kansas! From the most recognizable, like the KU Jayhawk and the K-State Wildcat, to the more obscure Fowler High School Goldbugs and the Hill City Ringnecks, Jordan Poland, Speakers Bureau, features the history and pageantry of Kansas mascots. Explore with us the unique, historical ties that many sports mascots have to their communities before playing the state’s newest and greatest trivia game, “Name that Kansas Mascot!” June 27th at Augusta Public Library at 10:30am. Click here for details.

For more information about upcoming KHC-supported events in your region, visit our calendar.

 

 

Hello from the Atlantic Ocean

atlantic

Hello from the Atlantic Ocean. As we cross the powerful Atlantic, we ponder its place in history and its power to inspire to writers, musicians, and artists. While you may think that swimming or rowing are more appropriate sports for this leg of endeavor, we Kansans are still pursuing our goal of “walking” around the globe. We’ve walked a combined 3,359 miles, starting in Goodland, Kansas, to our current point in the briny blue and we’re still going.

Join us on our quest to circle the globe and add your steps to the total.  Click here to download a Walking Scorecard to track your steps or minutes exercised. You can even pick up a pedometer to count your steps at the Hometown Teams Smithsonian exhibition in in Atchison (opening June 27), Perry, and Humboldt, and at participating Hometown Teams partner sites.

Where will we go next? Will we reach dry land? Stay tuned for next week’s post and follow KHC’s walking progress on Facebook,  Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Making Plays and Making History: Atchison’s Lincoln School Kittens

This year, KHC features weekly posts related to the Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition Hometown Teams, opening at the Atchison County Historical Society and Museum on June 27th.

Atchison's Lincoln School Kittens were successful throughout their playing years, even winning championships in 1945 and 1936 (pictured).  Image Courtesy Atchison County Historical Society.

Atchison’s Lincoln School Kittens were successful throughout their playing years, even winning championships in 1945 and 1936 (pictured). Image Courtesy Atchison County Historical Society.

Sports often give members of racial minorities the chance to challenge racist thinking. From Jesse Owens to Remember the Titans, American sports history is full of stories of how athletic integration led to integration in other areas of community, too.

But for the Lincoln School Kittens of Atchison, Kansas, the opposite proved to be the case.

Before the 1950s, African American high school students in the northeast Kansas town attended high school with whites, but they were often prohibited from taking part in extracurricular activities and some athletics. Instead, black high school students who wanted to play sports would complete the day’s classes at Atchison High School, then suit up for athletics at the town’s segregated elementary and junior high school, the Lincoln School.

It was a familiar environment for many of the returning players, almost all of whom graduated from the Lincoln School themselves. Built in 1921, the Lincoln School educated the children of Atchison’s African American community for 34 years.

The Lincoln School got its own basketball team around 1927, when the Kittens began to play. As with other segregated teams, the issue wasn’t talent. It was touching. White players and fans objected to the degree of interracial contact that took place in basketball, so it remained segregated long after non-contact sports like track were integrated.

After spending years in the elementary and junior high basketball programs, students who moved on to Atchison High School could remain connected to their former teachers and classmates through the school’s basketball program.

That sense of community helped the Kittens grow into an excellent team. They won the Kansas state high school basketball championship in 1936, less than 10 years after the program got its start, then won again in 1945.

By the early 1950s, that talent was being noticed at Atchison High School.

In fact, as former Lincoln School student Arthur Bratton told Atchison Globe writer Mary Meyers in 2006, it was the AHS coaches who made the final decision to integrate the basketball team: “‘They told [the school administration] they were going to play the blacks on the team,’ Mr. Bratton said.”

That was the end of the Kittens, but not of what the Lincoln School meant to the community.

Situated among the homes of many of its students and surrounded by businesses and churches serving a primarily African American clientele, the school increasingly began to serve as the main point of contact for integrationists in Atchison. Thanks to the efforts of the faculty, staff and students at the Lincoln School, by the time that the Supreme Court ruled on Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas in May 1954, a desegregation plan for Atchison was already in its final stages.

“Sports creates some interesting situations,” said Chris Taylor, director of the Atchison County Historical Society and Hometown Teams Project Director. He hopes that by focusing on sports, the exhibit will attract new audiences, allowing the town to shine a light on the rich African American history in Atchison.

Both the Hometown Teams traveling Smithsonian exhibition and Atchison’s exhibition about the Lincoln School Kittens will be on display at the Atchison County Historical Society and Museum from June 27 through August 9. For more information, contact the Atchison County Historical Society at 913-367-6238.

Humanities Happenings: 06/19-06/21

Don’t miss the last weekend of the “Hometown Teams” Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition in Greensburg, and read on to find out about unique KHC-supported events in Cottonwood Falls, Lawrence, Lansing, and more.

 

Photo courtesy of Pageantry, Inc.

Photo courtesy of Pageantry, Inc.

Great Bend: Dixieland Jazz on the Lawn & Watermelon Feed
The “Argonne Rebels Drum & Bugle Corps” partner site exhibition continues at the Great Bend Public Library this weekend. Join local musicians as they share their talents on the library lawn.

This event supports “Argonne Rebels Drum & Bugle Corps,” a special partner site exhibit that tells the story of a competitive drum and bugle corps established in Great Bend in the 1940s. The exhibit is on display through August 31st.

The project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. June 19th at Great Bend Public Library at 6:00pm. Click here for details.

 

The Lady Bulldogs of Chase County, 2015 State Softball Champions. Image courtesy of Chase County Historical Society.

Cottonwood Falls: “A League of Our Own”
The public is invited to opening of “Chase County: A League of Our Own,” a special partner site exhibit that explores the baseball tradition of rural Chase County. Special guests include local athletes and longtime coaching staff. The exhibit is on display through November 14th.

This project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. June 20th at Chase County Historical Society at 1:00pm. Click here for details.

 

 

Photo courtesy of Beverly Gardner and Watkins Museum of History

Photo courtesy of Beverly Gardner and Watkins Museum of History

Lawrence: “Larryville Offbeat Sports Day”
Watch and learn how to play some of Lawrence’s favorite unconventional team sports at this day-long festival. Featuring exhibition games from Scary Larry Bike Polo, the Kaw Valley Kickball League, pickleball, the University of Kansas Quidditch Team, a Red Dog’s Dog Days workout, and more.

This event supports “Of Two Minds: The Conventional and Unconventional Sides of Lawrence Sports,” a series of public events. The project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. Sponsored by Watkins Museum of History. June 20th at East Lawrence Recreation Center at 10:00am. Click here for details.

 

Larry Burke

Larry Burke

Abilene: Trench Warfare
Soldiers in the trenches of World War I suffered extreme temperatures, disease, and parasites in addition to the psychological stresses of war. Larry Burke, Speakers Bureau, explores events leading to the outbreak of war, and will examine the strategies and tactics of trench warfare with special emphasis on the individuals who fought the war along the Western Front. How did the soldiers cope with the immense stress of the trenches? How did they find the courage to go “over the top” into the maelstrom of no man’s land? Many WWI trench warfare soldiers suffered from “shell shock,” a combat stress reaction similar to today’s post-traumatic stress disorder. How do the stresses of WWI relate to soldiers today? June 20th at Dickinson County Historical Society at 7:00pm. Click here for details.

 

Deborah White

Deborah White

Independence: Preservation Workshop
This public preservation workshop will be led by Deborah White, Digital Librarian at Pittsburg State University’s Axe Library. The preservation workshop is aimed at helping veterans and their families preserve material related to military service.

This event supports “The 1011th -A Story of Service Throughout the Years,” a project to collect and preserve the images of veterans who served with the 1011th Quartermaster Company, US Army Reserve, during deployments to Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Sponsored by RSVP Four County. June 20th at Memorial Hall at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

Funding is provided by the Kansas Humanities Council, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Standing Together initiative.

 

Jordan Poland

Jordan Poland

Greensburg: From Jayhawks to Goldbugs
They come in all shapes, sizes, and colors and are some of the most recognizable characters of our state: the mascots of Kansas! From the most recognizable, like the KU Jayhawk and the K-State Wildcat, to the more obscure Fowler High School Goldbugs and the Hill City Ringnecks, Jordan Poland, Speakers Bureau, shares the history and pageantry of Kansas mascots. Explore the unique, historical ties that many sports mascots have to their communities before playing the state’s newest and greatest trivia game, “Name that Kansas Mascot!” June 20th at Kiowa County Historical Museum & Soda Fountain at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

 

 

William E. Fischer, Jr.

William E. Fischer, Jr.

Lansing: Dark Skies
Popular images of chivalrous World War I aviators, goggled with silk scarves flowing, were quite different from the dark reality of the skies above Europe. As the war stalemated across Western Europe and casualties began to mount, aviation became a critical component in war planning and operations. Cutting-edge technology on land, sea, and air ensured that the war of November 1918 little resembled the war of August 1914. William E. Fischer, Jr., Speakers Bureau, explores how aviation became sophisticated and differentiated into aerial observation, bombardment, and pursuit. June 20th at Lansing Historical Museum at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

Stay up to date with upcoming KHC-supported events by visiting our Calendar of Events.

 

 

 

 

Postcards from the Road

smithsonian

We have arrived. Since January, KHC has been collecting Kansans’ steps walked and minutes exercised with the goal of “walking” the Hometown Teams Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition back to its home in Washington, D.C., from Goodland, the westernmost point on the Kansas tour. When we embarked on this journey, we thought it would take us a full ten months to reach our destination. We were wrong. With the participation of Hometown Teams visitors, host and partner sites’ staff and volunteers, and KHC’s staff and board members, we reached our goal of 1,459 miles…and then we kept on going.

Now KHC has a new goal: To “walk” the Hometown Teams exhibition around the world. We can do it, but we need your help.

To reach our new goal, we’ll need to count every step walked and every minute spent exercising now through November.  Click here to download a Walking Scorecard to add your exercise counts to the total. You can even pick up a pedometer to count your steps at the Hometown Teams Smithsonian exhibition in Greensburg (through June 21), at upcoming Smithsonian exhibition venues in Atchison, Perry, and  Humboldt, and at participating Hometown Teams partner sites.

Then, follow KHC’s walking progress on Facebook,  Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest for weekly #walkwednesday postcard updates from around the world.

Why walking? Healthy citizens make healthy communities. Using the sports themes in the Hometown Teams exhibition as a starting point, KHC helps communities make the connection between the humanities and a healthy lifestyle.

Statewide support for Hometown Teams comes from the Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas Foundation.

Heritage on the Half-Pipe

This year, KHC features weekly posts related to the Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition Hometown Teams, currently touring Kansas.

For some Native American tribes, skateboarding has become a thriving part of Native culture.  Image Courtesy Luke Graham/Aristocracy Skateboarding.

For some Native American tribes, skateboarding has become a thriving part of Native culture. Image Courtesy Luke Graham/Aristocracy Skateboarding.

A country as devoted to the idea of choice as the United States was never going to be content with just the standard sports options.

Enter skateboarding.

Once associated almost exclusively with California, where it was developed by surfers looking for a way to simulate surfing when the waves were flat, skateboarding eventually became a national—and global—sports phenomenon.

In fact, according to the International Association of Skateboard Companies, about 12 millions American kids skateboard. (For perspective, that’s more than are involved in Little League baseball.)

Among those who contributed to the sport’s skyrocketing popularity over the past few decades?

Native Americans from a wide range of reservations and tribal backgrounds, many of whom have found ways to use skateboarding to express their Native culture and preserve their communal history.

In the 1980s, Arizona’s White Mountain Apache Reservation began hosting some of the earliest local Native American skateboarding competitions. Over the years, these competitions have grown in size and popularity. One of the largest is the All Nations Skate Jam, held annually since 2007.

Since skateboarding is one of the most popular sports on Native American reservations, it’s a good way to keep younger tribe members invested in their heritage while also encouraging non-Native education on Native history and culture.

For example, the skateboarding company Native Skates distributes sets of Four Directions skateboard wheels, where the color of each wheel (white, yellow, red and black) represented a different aspect of the medicine wheel, a symbol sacred to some Great Plains tribes.

Many Native skateboard artists also decorate their boards with images important to Native culture, commemorating meaningful events, people and places through their artwork. This artwork often comments on the shameful treatment the U.S. has inflicted on Native communities, allowing Native skateboarders to fuse Native American culture with skate culture to powerful effect.

That’s part of the mission of the Native nonprofit Nibwaakaawin, meaning “Wisdom,” which wants to use skateboarding “to foster creativity, build courage, enable cultural identity and pride, and promote non-violent and healthy physical activity.”