Humanities Happenings: 04/24-04/26

Which Humanities Happenings event will you attend this weekend? Choose from a variety of film screenings, presentations, and museum exhibitions!

Photo courtesy of Kansas Natural Resource Council and kansasmemory.org, Kansas State Historical Society. Copy and Reuse Restrictions apply.

Photo courtesy of Kansas Natural Resource Council and kansasmemory.org, Kansas State Historical Society. Copy and Reuse Restrictions apply.

Lawrence: The Waters of Kansas
The Ogallala aquifer, backbone of Kansas agriculture, is 30% gone. Perennial streams are now classified as historic. Reservoirs are silting in and increasingly subject to toxic blue-green algae. The time is ripe for a statewide conversation about our water – how we’ve used it, how most of us take it for granted, and our struggle to account for future generations.

The Kansas Natural Resource Council, with help from the Kansas Humanities Council and the National Science Foundation-funded Biofuels and Climate Change: Farmers’ Land Use Decisions research team, has produced a documentary film series featuring water resources and people from across Kansas who casually and intimately interact with groundwater or surface water, reservoirs or rivers. “The Waters of Kansas-Cheyenne Bottoms” and “The Waters of Kansas-Farming over the Ogallala” touch on the history of developing and using a water source, competing interests, and how communities grappling with the future. April 24th at University of Kansas-Spooner Hall at 4:00pm. Click here for details.

 

oakley_cornhusker_logo Oakley: Corn on the Plains Day
Compete in a corn recipe challenge. Take the contest from the field to the dinner table and “Harvest” the spirit of culinary competition. Teams can enter a dish for People’s Choice. Remarks provided by Jane Marshall, food historian at Kansas State University.

Join a roundtable discussion with local, long time farmers about the past, present and future of corn harvesting in America.

Video presentation of Smoky Hill Public Television’s production, “Traveling Kansas, Oakley” featuring the Oakley Corn Festival and the annual Kansas State Cornhusking Contest. April 24th at Buffalo Bill Cultural Center at 11:00am. Click here for details.

This event supports “Cornhusking: Harvesting the Spirit of Competition,” a special exhibit at the Buffalo Bill Cultural Center that explores the Kansas State Cornhusking competition. The project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities.

 

This 1867 Harper's Weekly illustration, "Buffalo Hunting on the Plains by Officers of the United States Army," shows the kind of hunting that took place at Fort Larned.  Image Courtesy Fort Larned Old Guard.

This 1867 Harper’s Weekly illustration, “Buffalo Hunting on the Plains by Officers of the United States Army,” shows the kind of hunting that took place at Fort Larned. Image Courtesy Fort Larned Old Guard.

Larned: History of the Hunt
The public is invited to an open house for “The Evolution of Hunting: From Survival to Marketing to Sport at Fort Larned,” a special exhibition that examines how hunting transitioned from a survival necessity to a leisure sport enjoyed by cavalry officers and their wives at Fort Larned.

The open house is held in conjunction with the Fort Larned Old Guard’s “Mess & Muster” day of events. All events are free and open to the public. April 25th at Fort Larned National Historic Site at 10:00am. Click here for details.

At 1:30 PM, Fort Hays State University History Professor Juti Winchester will present “New Yorkers on the Warpath: Easterners Go West to Hunt.”

The project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities.

 

 

Lizzie climbing Scersceau in full bustle  skirt. Photo courtesy of Martin & Osa Safari Museum.

Lizzie climbing Scersceau in full bustle skirt. Photo courtesy of Martin & Osa Safari Museum.

Chanute: Mountaineer Pioneer
The public is invited to learn about a yearlong project to conserve the photographs of Elizabeth Main Le Blond, a pioneering mountaineer, photographer, and cinematographer of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The event is held in conjunction with the Safari Family Fun Festival, which includes an Amazing Race-style selfie competition through Downtown Chanute. April 25th at Martin & Osa Johnson Safari Museum at 10:00am. Click here for details.

The “Queen of the Mountain” exhibition is on display through June 27th and is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities.

 

 

Jordan Poland

Jordan Poland

Goodland: Athletic Architecture
Kansans place a high level of importance on their athletic architecture. From Allen Fieldhouse in Lawrence to the Hornet’s Nest in Dighton, Hubbard Stadium in Smith Center to Veteran’s Stadium in Coffeyville, we cheer for our teams in a variety of buildings that commemorate fallen soldiers, lift the spirits of communities, and entertain us with the newest technologies. Jordan Poland, Speakers’ Bureau, will explore Kansas sports venues through time, as well as the stories of the athletes and fans who have called these places home. Walk through a timeline of athletic architecture in Kansas, across the spectrum of sports, to illustrate how these places have affected our collective memory and have been the gathering point for generations of fans. April 25th at High Plains Museum at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

 

 

Marla Day

Marla Day

Lawrence: “The Things They Carried Home”
This public preservation workshop will be led by Marla Day, senior curator at Kansas State University’s Historic Costume and Textile Museum. The workshop is part of “The Things They Carried Home,” a series of preservation projects and preservation workshops aimed at helping veterans and their families preserve material related to military service. April 25th at Watkins Museum of History at 9:30am. Click here for details.

 

 

 

Donald Blakeslee

Donald J. Blakeslee

Marion: An Unexpected History
Donald J. Blakeslee, Speakers’ Bureau, looks at Kansas in the era before Columbus. Consider what was not here: no cities, no roads, no mechanization, no domestic animals other than the dog. It is easy to imagine that the small human communities that occupied Kansas for thousands of years would have existed in relative isolation, focused on hand-to-mouth existence–but nothing could be further from the truth. The prehistoric inhabitants of Kansas traveled widely, even to central Mexico; traded with the Pueblo people of the Southwest; and included people interested in such arcane subjects as meteors and meteorites and were part of a continent-wide intellectual tradition. April 25th at Marion Historical Museum at 7:00pm. Click here for details.

 

 

Brice Obermeyer

Brice Obermeyer

Park City: Reclaiming their Past
Many museums across the United States have human remains, funeral objects, and the sacred items of American Indians in their collections. The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) legally guaranteed American Indian tribes the right to reclaim these items in an effort to restore the humanity of these individuals. When the law took effect in 1990, museum staff, board members, and volunteers feared conflict and a loss of valuable historical artifacts. However, Brice Obermeyer, Speakers’ Bureau, explains increased collaboration between museums and Indian tribes has been sparked by NAGPRA, which is now appropriately viewed as American Indian Civil Rights legislation. April 25th at Park City Public Library at 7:00pm. Click here for details.

 

 

Joyce Thierer

Joyce Thierer

Stafford: A Scattered People
Author Gerald McFarland offers a vivid, personal history of five generations of his family who migrated west over the course of two centuries. Their struggles, successes, and causes (one relative was John Brown) mirror our country’s history and dreams. 245 pp. Joyce Thierer leads the TALK book discussion. April 26th at Stafford County Historical & Genealogical Society at 1:30pm. Click here for details.

 

 

 

 

Lorraine Madway

Lorraine Madway

Glasco: Olympic Dreams & the Road to Gold
The 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin are most remembered for the worldwide political tensions in the early days of Adolf Hitler’s rise to power. Little remembered is that it was also the first time basketball was played as an Olympic sport. The gold medal U.S. team was composed in large part by Kansans who played on an industrial league team, the Globe Refiners of McPherson. Lorraine Madway, Speakers’ Bureau, celebrates the historic connections of basketball in Kansas to the 1936 Olympics and provides an opportunity to examine the culture of community sporting events during this time. This presentation will include a showing of a short KHC-funded documentary from the McPherson perspective, Oil & Gold: The McPherson Globe Refiners Basketball Story, produced by the McPherson CVB and Keith Cantrell. April 26th at The Corner Store at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

 

For more information about upcoming KHC events, take a look at our events calendar.