Humanities Happenings: 04/17-04/19

Humanities Happenings are here and waiting for you! Join one of these KHC events this weekend.

Sandra Wiechert

Sandra Wiechert

Topeka: A Yellow Raft in Blue Water
Michael Dorris’ novel starts in the present and moves backward in time to tell the story of 15-year-old Rayona, her American Indian mother Christine, and the fierce and mysterious Ida, whose secrets, betrayals, and dreams bind all three women’s lives together. 372 pp. Sandra Wiechert leads the TALK book discussion. April 17th at Aldersgate Village at 2:30pm. Click here for details.

 

 

 

Ron Wilson

Ron Wilson

Holton: Midwest Melting Pot
Many threads have been interwoven in the fabric of Kansas culture, from the Plains Indians to European homesteaders and African American Exodusters. A number of rural communities have grown in recent years because of Latino and South Asian immigrants who are working and raising their families in Kansas. Ron Wilson, Speakers Bureau, highlights real-world examples of people who have used their diverse cultural backgrounds to contribute constructively to Kansas communities. April 17th at Trinity Lutheran Church at 6:00pm. Click here for details.

 

 

 

John Edgar Tidwell

John Edgar Tidwell

Augusta: The Fire Next Time
At once a powerful evocation of the author’s early life in Harlem and a disturbing examination of racial injustice, James Baldwin’s book galvanized our nation in the early days of the Civil Rights movement. 106 pp. John Edgar Tidwell leads the TALK book discussion. April 18th at Augusta Public Library at 10:30am. Click here for details.

 

 

 

MJ Morgan

M. J. Morgan

Lindsborg: Looking for Lost History
Kansas has nearly 9000 disappeared towns and communities, caused by its unusual and spectacularly fast settlement history. The variety of town types–from colony and end-of-line towns to cumulative and rural communities–is as striking as the stories they left behind. Kansas towns are diverse and contain vital human histories of failure and persistence against the odds. M.J. Morgan, Speakers Bureau, will explore research conducted on lost Kansas places and discuss problems of recovery of information. April 18th at Bethany Lutheran Church at 2:15pm. Click here for details. 

 

 

 

Travis Larsen

Travis Larsen

Hays: Ambiguous Roles & Representations
The use of Native American imagery for sports mascots has a long and controversial history. Whereas some proponents say that the mascots honor native cultures, others argue that they reinforce ethnic stereotypes and cultural misunderstanding. Universities such as Stanford and Marquette have changed their team names and mascots in response to the debate. Other teams, however, have fought cases in court in order to preserve their mascot images. Travis Larsen, Speakers Bureau, will explore the history of these images, the controversies surrounding them, and the various ways sports teams have changed, eliminated, or defended the use of Native American-themed mascots. April 18th at Ellis County Historical Society at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

 

Harvey County Courthouse Photo credit: Harvey County Historical Museum & Archives, Newton, KS

Harvey County Courthouse
Photo credit: Harvey County Historical Museum & Archives, Newton, KS

Newton: A Walk Down Memory Lane & Up the Courthouse Steps
Join community members for a short walk down the memory lane where the Harvey County Courthouse has resided! Director Debra Hiebert and curator Kristine Schmucker will share photos and fun information, and invite program attendees to share their memories and stories. How have YOU used our county courthouse, past and present? April 19th at Harvey County Historical Museum & Archives at 2:00pm. Click here for details. 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Weems

Robert Weems

North Newton: “Defining the ‘Other'”
Robert Weems, a history professor at Wichita State University, presents “Defining the ‘Other’: A History of Racial Stereotypes.” This lecture supports “Sorting Out Race,” a special exhibit that uses thrift store race-related objects as a starting point for conversations about race and racial identify. April 19th at Kauffman Museum at 3:00pm. Click here for details. 

 

 

 

Sara Jane Richter

Sara Jane Richter

Scott City: Dust Bowl Gardeners
During the bleak days of the Dust Bowl, women used their green thumbs and gardening skills to extend their daily menus, earn money, and even beautify their dreary environs. Drawing from first-hand accounts, Sara Jane Richter, Speakers Bureau, explores the vegetables, flowers, and medicinal herbs these women cultivated within the harshest conditions during the Great Depression. By experimenting with and cultivating hardy breeds many women were able to augment their families’ menu, larder, meals, and mood. April 19th at El Quartelejo Museum at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

 

 

Please visit KHC’s upcoming events calendar for a humanities event that interests you!