Humanities Happenings: 03/27-03/29

This weekend boasts an impressive host of humanities events throughout Kansas. Read on to find out what, when, and where they are!

Wichita: “Black and White Remember Together”

The public is invited to “Black and White Remember Together: The Troubled Second Half of the Sixties,” an event that highlights an oral history project exploring the memories of black and white students who experiences life in Wichita during the turbulent years of the late 1960s. March 27th at The Kansas African American Museum at 6:00pm. Click here for details.

Michael J. Zogry

Michael J. Zogry

Hays: “Polo on the Plains”

The public is invited to the opening of “Polo on the Plains.” Hays’ Hometown Teams partner site exhibition explores polo’s history in Victoria, a community settled by British immigrants in 1872.

Also, hear Michael Zogry, University of Kansas Professor of Indigenous Studies, present “Sports as Religion: Fact or Fiction?”

Are there any sports or athletic games in the world that are considered religious? Have there ever been any? Can sports such as basketball, football, or soccer be religions for players or spectators? Zogry will provide an introduction to these questions by surveying several examples from different cultures and time periods, as well as selected scholarly interpretations. March 28th at Ellis County Historical Society Museum at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

Louise M. Hanson

Louise M. Hanson

Dodge City: Food for Thought

Community cookbooks have carried the stories of Kansas women over the years, sharing sentiments of home, family, and faith. Louise M. Hanson, Speakers Bureau, provides a survey of Kansas cookbooks from 1874 to the present, which reveal not only changes in foodways but also poems, prayers, personal reflections, and histories. These humble publications show that food, home, community, and faith were the foundation upon which Kansas women constructed their lives. March 28th at Boot Hill Museum at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

 

Phil S. Dixon

Phil S. Dixon

Concordia: Trailblazers on the Diamond

Formed in 1920, the Kansas City Monarchs revolutionized baseball: not only were they charter members of the Negro National League and the first professional team to use outdoor lighting, the Monarchs also sent more players to the major leagues than any other Negro League franchise. Phil S. Dixon’s Speakers Bureau presentation explores the exciting early barnstorming days of the Monarchs, highlights great players such as Wilber “Bullet” Rogan, Satchel Paige, and Jackie Robinson who wore the uniform, and connects the spirit of the Monarchs to the many Kansas communities in which they played. Where possible, specific games and players from your community will be discussed. March 28th at Cloud County Historical Society Museum at 1:30pm. Click here for details.

Michaeline Chance-Reay

Michaeline Chance-Reay

Mount Hope: The All-True Travels & Adventures of Lidie Newton

Jane Smiley’s book, set mostly in the Kansas Territory shortly before the Civil War, follows narrator Lydia “Lidie” Harkness as she recounts her adventures while disguised as a boy, reporting for a proslavery newspaper, and helping a woman escape a plantation. 452 pp. Michaeline Chance-Reay leads the TALK book discussion March 28th at Mount Hope Public Library at 9:00am. Click here for details.

 

 

 

Deborah Divine

Deborah Divine

Elkhart: Hands-on History

In the early 20th century, Emporia was home to a group of innovative quilters that included Rose Kretsinger, Charlotte Whitehill, and Hannah Haynes Headlee. Today their quilts are housed in art museums and revered internationally. Learn about Kansas quilts from this time period and the unique collaborations that sparked “the Emporia, Kansas phenomenon” and some of the finest quilts of the 20th century. Deborah Divine, Speakers Bureau, will give a lecture and lead a brief discussion. Then, participants will make a Kretsinger-inspired quilt square of their own. March 28th at Morton County Historical Society Museum at 10:00am. Click here for details.

 

 

 

Hometown Teams_Title Treatment_color_FNLGoodland: Hometown Teams Day Camp

Hometown Teams Day Camp invites kids to make the connection between sports and healthy behaviors with sports and exercise demonstrations and the opportunity to cook and enjoy a healthy meal with Extension Agent Karen Jones. March 28th at High Plains Museum. Click here for details.

 

Thomas Prasch

Thomas Prasch

Garden City: An Artist of the Floating World

Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel brings the world of mid-20th century Japan to life. The story follows an artist, Masuji Ono, through his early years in the pre-war teahouse culture, his growing support of wartime militarism, and finally his postwar confrontations with that legacy and its consequences for his family. 206 pp. Thomas Prasch leads the TALK book discussion March 28th at Finney County Public Library at 11:00am. Click here for details.

 

 

Isaias J. McCaffery

Isaias J. McCaffery

Park City: Between Two Worlds

During the 19th and early 20th centuries, the children of Kansas immigrants lived with their feet planted in two distinct worlds. Immersed in the traditions of their transplanted parents, many young ethnic community members also came to see themselves as authentic Americans–at least to varying degrees. Many children became entirely comfortable in “American settings,” completely familiar with the language and culture of mainstream life on the southern Plains. Isaias J. McCaffery, Speakers Bureau, explores how these children often felt pulled between two identities–with two languages, two behavior patterns, and often two names–not entirely rooted in either camp. March 28th at Park City Public Library at 7:00pm. Click here for details.

John K. Burchill

John K. Burchill

Kinsley: Prairie Lawmen

Kansas was once the center of operations for many organized bands of horse thieves. In reaction, many independent anti-horse thief societies were formed, with the national Anti-Horse Thief Association especially strong in Kansas. John K. Burchill, Speakers Bureau, discusses how, by 1910, Kansas held the most members, was home to The Anti-Horse Thief Weekly News, and consistently had residents hold offices in the national order. So effective were these organizations that local law enforcement were often the first to join, and the Kansas Bank Commissioner called for their assistance to help fight bank robberies that plagued the state. March 29th at Edwards County 4-H Building at 5:00pm. Click here for details.

D.W. Carter

D.W. Carter

Wichita: “Fire From the Kansas Sky”

On a cold Saturday morning in 1965, an Air Force KC-135 tanker carrying 31,000 gallons of jet fuel crashed into a congested African-American neighborhood in Wichita. When the fire subsided, 47 people, mostly children, were dead or injured, several homes were destroyed, and families were splintered–and that was just the beginning of the nightmare. D.W. Carter, Speakers Bureau, explores why the plane crashed, how the community responded, and how race relations in Wichita were further strained because of the disaster. March 29th at Rockwell Branch, Wichita Public Library at 2:30pm. Click here for details.

 

Whitney Baker

Whitney Baker

Leavenworth: “The Things They Carried Home” 

This public workshop is led by Whitney Baker, a conservator at University of Kansas Libraries. “The Things They Carried Home” preservation workshop is aimed at helping veterans and their families preserve material related to military service. March 29th at Leavenworth Public Library at 2:00pm. Click here for details.

 

 

 

For more information about KHC events in 2015, visit the calendar on our website.