Humanities Happenings: 02/27–03/01

Please note that some of this weekend’s KHC events have been rescheduled. Be sure to contact the organizations hosting KHC events for possible schedule changes due to inclement weather.

This weekend’s Humanities Happenings invites you to engage with state history, poetry, literature, and jazz.

Photo courtesy of: Kansas State Historical Society

Photo courtesy of: Kansas State Historical Society

In Case You Missed It: “KPR Presents”

Last year marked the 60th anniversary of the historic desegregation decision in Brown v. the Topeka Board of Education. To celebrate the anniversary, the Kansas Humanities Council, Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library, and Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site joined with NPR’s StoryCorps project to interview area residents about growing up in the town whose name became part of the landmark case. Click here to listen to last Sunday’s segment on kansaspublicradio.org.

The oral history project is a collaboration between the Topeka-Shawnee County Public Library, Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site, and the Kansas Humanities Council.

StoryCorps is a national nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share, and preserve the stories of our lives.

Wyatt Townley Photo by: Terry Weckbaugh

Wyatt Townley
Photo by: Terry Weckbaugh

Hutchinson: Home Is Where the Heart Is

The notion of “home” is a long-held Kansas value. Join Poet Laureate of Kansas Wyatt Townley as part of her statewide conversation about coming home to poetry. “Poetry is a place we can return to in all kinds of weather, with its innate power to heal and comfort, transform and inspire. Its porch light is always on.” February 27 at 6:00pm at Hutchinson Public Library. Click here for details.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kevin Rabas

Kevin Rabas

Park City: Jazz in the Heartland

Kansas City jazz thrived on diversity: just as it melded and reshaped African and European musical traditions, it also gained energy and vitality from the talents of musicians of all races. KC’s jazz visionaries crossed social barriers and championed racial integration. Kevin Rabas, Speakers Bureau, explores how musicians such as Charlie Parker, Coleman Hawkins, and Lester Young drew national attention to the need for racial harmony by integrating KC’s black musicians union, touring with integrated bands, and writing songs that advocated equal rights in the early years of the Civil Rights movement. February 28 at 7:00pm at Park City Public Library. Click here fore details.

 

 

Gene T. Chávez

Gene T. Chávez

Mount Hope: John Brown: The Legend Revisited

Author Merrill D. Peterson gives us Brown in his day, yet shows how the abolitionist’s image, celebrated in art, literature, and journalism, has shed the infamy conferred by “Bleeding Kansas,” becoming a symbol of American idealism to activists along the political spectrum. 172 pp. Gene T. Chavez leads the TALK book discussion February 28 at 1:00pm at Mount Hope Public LibraryClick here for details.

Stay up to date with KHC events in 2015 by clicking on our calendar.

 

 

Rebels with a Corps

This year, KHC features weekly posts related to the Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition Hometown Teams, currently touring Kansas.

The Argonne Rebels drum and bugle corps put together a rare three-peat of national championships in the early 1970s. Image Courtesy Pageantry, Inc., Clay Ward.

The Argonne Rebels drum and bugle corps put together a rare three-peat of national championships in the early 1970s. Image Courtesy Pageantry, Inc., Clay Ward.

For the Argonne Rebels, a World Class competitive junior drum and bugle corps active from 1947 to 1984, winning back-to-back American Legion National Championships in 1971 and 1972 was hard enough.

The Great Bend, Kansas-based corps had no idea that their third consecutive championship would be the easiest they’d ever win.

According to Jeff Yeager, who marched with the Rebels from 1967 to 1974, most corps couldn’t afford travel to Hawaii, where the Legion convention was going to be held. So the competition was canceled, and the Argonne Rebels were declared 1973 champions by proclamation.

Good luck, certainly. But without the previous championships, the third wouldn’t have happened. And those two came purely out of hard work and talent—things that members of the prestigious Argonne Rebels had in spades.

A charter member of Drum Corps International, the corps won the first of their 16 Kansas State American Legion Championships in 1955. Under the direction of  longtime corps director and DCI Hall of Famer Glenn Opie, they became a nationally recognized corps, recording highly placed finishes at competitions across the country. (Watch a video of a 1971 performance here.)

“All this happened from a community of 20,000 people competing against corps from major metropolitan populations,” Yeager added.

As the parents and supporters who helped make the group a success continue to age, Yeager hopes the Argonne Rebels exhibit will provide a way to honor the community’s contributions and extend the Rebels’ legacy in Great Bend.

With over 2000 alumni passing through the program, their presence is still felt in the area, said Jennifer King, Great Bend Public Library’s Hometown Teams Partner Site Project Director.

“For a team that hasn’t been active since the early ‘80s, it’s quite impressive that it still maintains such strong roots in the local community,” King said. “Which I think exemplifies the notion of a ‘Hometown Team.’”

“The Hometown Team: How Our Community Championed Its Youth” will be on display at the Great Bend Public Library from June 1 to August 31. For more information, visit http://greatbendpl.info.

In conjunction with Great Bend’s local Hometown Teams exhibit, Drums Across Kansas will perform their regional drum and bugle corps competition, March of Champtions, July 14 at 7:00pm. The competition is co-sponsored by Drum Corps International and will take place in Great Bend. Click here for details.

Humanities Happenings: 02/20-02/22

Don’t let February’s dreary weather drag you down! Expand your horizons with one of this weekend’s Humanities Happenings events.

Kevin Rabas

Kevin Rabas

Olathe: All That Jazz

Kansas City jazz thrived on diversity: just as it melded and reshaped African and European musical traditions, it also gained energy and vitality from the talents of musicians of all races. KC’s jazz visionaries crossed social barriers and championed racial integration. Kevin Rabas, Speakers Bureau, explores how musicians such as Charlie Parker, Coleman Hawkins, and Lester Young drew national attention to the need for racial harmony by integrating KC’s black musicians union, touring with integrated bands, and writing songs that advocated equal rights in the early years of the Civil Rights movement. February 20th at 7:00pm at Olathe Public Library. Click here for details.

Angela O. Bates

Angela O. Bates

 

 

 

Wichita: The Politics of Race

Before homesteading as free men in the African American settlement of Nicodemus, Kansas, Tom Johnson and John Samuels were enslaved by U.S. Vice President Richard M. Johnson (1837-1841) and his daughter Imogene Pence. Johnson became a controversial figure when he married Julia Chinn, a biracial woman and mother of his two daughters. Angela O. Bates, Speakers Bureau, follows Tom and John’s journey from enslavement in Kentucky to freedom experienced in an all-Black town. Learn about their lives on the Johnson plantation, the tragic split of their families, and their migration and settlement at historic Nicodemus. February 21st at 7:00pm at Wichita Public Library, Alford Branch. Click here for details.

Sara Tucker

Sara Tucker

Topeka: A Doll’s House

The heroine of this famous play experiences a crisis of self-knowledge when she realizes that she must break free of a marriage that has made her her husband’s child. 232 pp. Sara Tucker leads the TALK book discussion February 22nd at 3:00pm at Aldersgate Village. Click here for details.

 

 

 

 

Jordan Poland

Jordan Poland

Ellinwood: What’s in a Mascot?

They come in all shapes, sizes, and colors and are some of the most recognizable characters of our state: the mascots of Kansas! From the most recognizable, like the KU Jayhawk and the K-State Wildcat, to the more obscure Fowler High School Goldbugs and the Hill City Ringnecks, Jordan Poland, Speakers Bureau, features the history and pageantry of Kansas mascots. Explore with us the unique, historical ties that many sports mascots have to their communities before playing the state’s newest and greatest trivia game, “Name that Kansas Mascot!” February 22nd at 1:30pm at Ellinwood School and Community Library. Click here for details.

 

 

 

 

storycorps_logo

Lawrence: “KPR Presents”

Last year marked the 60th anniversary of the historic desegregation decision in Brown v. the Topeka Board of Education. To celebrate the anniversary, the Kansas Humanities Council, Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library, and Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site joined with NPR’s StoryCorps project to interview area residents about growing up in the town whose name became part of the landmark case. February 22nd at 8:00pm on Kansas Public Radio (91.5FM). Click here for details.

The oral history project is a collaboration between the Topeka-Shawnee County Public Library, Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site, and the Kansas Humanities Council.

StoryCorps is a national nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share, and preserve the stories of our lives.

For more information about KHC-sponsored events later this month and later this year, click here.

 

 

 

Stranger than Fiction

This year, KHC features weekly posts related to the Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition Hometown Teams, currently touring Kansas.

The Western League Association Ball Park hosted a game between the Wichita Monrovians African-American baseball team and the KKK in 1925.  Image Courtesy Lawrence and Lucile Wulfmeyer Genealogy/Special Collections Center, Wichita Public Library.

The Western League Association Ball Park hosted a game between the Wichita Monrovians African-American baseball team and the KKK in 1925. Image Courtesy Lawrence and Lucile Wulfmeyer Genealogy/Special Collections Center, Wichita Public Library.

On June 21, 1925, Wichita’s Island Park ball field hosted a baseball game so strange that people are still talking about it 90 years later.

It was an unlikely match-up, to say the least: the entirely African American Wichita Monrovians baseball team versus the local Ku Klux Klan. And to add to the bizarreness, the teams hired Catholic umpires—just to make sure there was no favoritism involved.

It’s not hard to see why the Monrovians were willing to play the KKK. They were a professional baseball team, after all, with a sizeable economic stake in the local African American population, often funneling their earnings back into the community; any chance at new fans, black or white, was worth considering.

Even more importantly, however, the Monrovians saw the game as a chance to demonstrate their skills in a way that could strike a subtle blow for equality both on and off the baseball diamond.

The reasoning behind the KKK’s desire to play the Monrovians is less clear. Why would white supremacists willingly compete against an all-black team when there was a chance they would lose? (Not a small chance, either: the Monrovians dominated the Colored Western League in its only year of existence. They were, by all accounts, a very good team.)

According to Only A Game, the game amounted to a public relations move for the Klan, who by 1925 were struggling to maintain a presence in Kansas:

“They were on their way out,” [Kansas historian Donna Rae] Pearson said. “…it was kind of one of those last ditch efforts to say, ‘Hey, we’re really not so bad, we’ll play with them, see?’”

It didn’t work. The Monrovians won the game, 10-8, and the Klan was officially booted from Kansas in 1927.

 

 

Humanities Happenings: 02/13–02/15

Attend one or more of these ongoing KHC events with someone you love this Valentine’s Day weekend:

Hesston Swathers "Hometown Teams" trading card

Hesston Swathers “Hometown Teams” trading card

Wichita: Sports Culture

The “Mascots of Kansas” exhibit explores the cultural significance of team mascots in sports, including the use of Native American imagery.

The project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. January 1st-August 31st at Kansas Sports Hall of Fame. Click here for details.

 

Drift and Drag

 

Topeka: Water and the Humanities

“Drift and Drag: Reflections on Water” is an exhibition that examines Kansans’ perceptions of and experience with water. January 16th-March 14th at Washburn University, Mulvane Art Museum. Click here for details.

 

 

 

Hometown Teams_Title Treatment_color_FNL

Sterling, Lyons, and Little River: County-Wide Community Sports

The Rice County Historical Society will explore stories of local sports heritage with exhibitions in Geneseo, Chase, Little River, Sterling, and Lyons. In Central Kansas, Hispanic youths formed their own teams and traveled to nearby communities to compete. The Rice County Historical Society will examine this story, and those of other nearby communities, with this exhibition.

The project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities.

  • February 7th-February 28th at Studio 96 in Sterling, KS. Click here for details.
  • February 8th-July 31st at Rice County Historical Society in Lyons, KS. Click here for details.
  • February 12th-May 23rd at Little River Senior Citizens Center in Little River, KS. Click here for details.                                                                                                            Ellinwood #3

Ellinwood: For the Love of the Game

“Heroes on the Sideline” is a local exhibition featuring Ellinwood sports fans and boosters.

“Heroes on the Sideline” is part of “Hometown Teams” Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition which explores the ways sports build and unite communities. The enthusiasm and dedication of fans, athletes, and coaches bonds us across time, cultures, generations, and geography. January 31st-March 15th at Ellinwood School and Community LibraryClick here for details.

Kinsley: Dust Bowl History

“Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry” national traveling exhibit about the causes and aftermath of the historic Dust Bowl period. The exhibit recalls a tragic period in our history – the drought and dust storms that wreaked havoc on the Great Plains in the 1930s – and explores its environmental and cultural consequences. What caused the fertile farms to turn to dust? How did people survive? What lessons have we learned.

In conjunction with the exhibit, the library will host “It Blew So Hard: The Dust Bowl & Great Depression in Western Kansas,” a series of reading discussions. January 10th-February 20th at Kinsley Public LibraryClick here for details.

Read about KHC’s February and ongoing events here.

 

 

Call for KHC Board Members

khc_slide_board1KHC is currently seeking nominations of Kansans to fill vacancies on its Board of Directors. Nominations are due April 1, 2015.

“Kansas Humanities Council board members are cultural leaders who value the humanities — literature, history, philosophy — and their ability to strengthen civic life,” said David Vail, chair of the Membership committee. “If you are passionate about the humanities and would like to promote and support the work of KHC in Kansas communities, consider a nomination to the KHC Board of Directors.”

The KHC is governed by a 22-member volunteer Board of Directors. Nominations must be submitted in writing. Members serve for a three-year term, with the possibility of renewal for a second term. Individuals may nominate themselves or others for board service. Click here for more information or contact Julie Mulvihill, executive director, at julie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359.

 

KHC Awards Veterans’ Grants to 17 Organizations

TTTCHKHC recently awarded $14,420 in The Things They Carried Home grants to seventeen organizations. Local contributions to the projects are estimated at $25,803. The grants support preservation projects and preservation workshops related to veterans and military service. The grants are part of Standing Together, a National Endowment for the Humanities initiative to promote understanding of the military experience and to support returning veterans.

Preservation Project Grants

Four organizations received Preservation Project Grants to preserve, document, and create access to military artifacts and archival materials.

RezVets, Leawood ($3,000)

“Writing My Way Back Home”
Writers’ workshops offer military veterans and their families an opportunity to document the veterans’ experience. Cindy McDermott, project director.

RSVP Four County, Independence ($2,988)

“The 1011th – A Story of Service Throughout the Years”
A project to collect and preserve the images of veterans who served with the 1011th Quartermaster Company Army Reserve during deployments in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Kathy Shephard, project director.

Solomon Valley – Highway 24 – Heritage Alliance, Glasco ($2,950)

“World War II Veterans Memorial Highway: A Tour of Remembrance, A Corridor of Service”
A project to inventory veterans memorials and collections of veterans artifacts in museums located along the route of US 24 designated as the World War II Veterans Memorial Highway. Joan Nothern, project director.

Wamego Public Library ($1,582)

“Veterans Oral History Project Conversion”
The library will digitize and preserve over 50 oral history interviews of Pottawatomie County veterans. Kelley Nordberg, project director.

Preservation Workshops

Thirteen organizations received $300 grants to host public community workshops, led by a preservation consultant, to help veterans and their families preserve uniforms, medals, letters, photographs, email correspondence, and other important items that soldiers carried home.

Abilene Public Library
Belleville Public Library
Brown County Historical Society, Hiawatha
Emporia Public Library
Friends of Fort Scott National Historic Site
Friends of the Valley Center Library, Inc.
Kinsley Library
Leavenworth Public Library
Lebo Branch of Coffey County Public Library
Mary Cotton Public Library, Sabetha
Overland Park Historical Society
Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library
Watkins Museum of History, Lawrence

For more information about The Things They Carried Home grant projects, contact Murl Riedel, director of grants, at murl(at)kansashumanities.org.

Nothing Soft about It

This year, KHC features weekly posts related to the Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition Hometown Teams, currently touring Kansas.

Mexican-American fast-pitch softball has a long history in Newton, Kansas.  Image Courtesy the Newton Kansan.

Mexican-American fast-pitch softball has a long history in Newton, Kansas. Image Courtesy the Newton Kansan.

It was supposed be a way to force Mexican-Americans to assimilate into U.S. culture.

Instead, for Mexican-Americans in Newton, Kansas, baseball and softball became cultural cornerstones of their communities for generations.

It’s not unusual for sons to play on the same teams their fathers—or their grandfathers—played on when they were young. (And as fast-pitch has grown in popularity among women’s teams, daughters have started getting in on the action, too.)

According to Zack Lewandowski, the strong family lineage involved in the game is just one example of how this sport, created by U.S. assimilation projects in the early twentieth century, grew into something that helps affirm Mexican-American culture.

Another is the Newton Mexican-American Fast-Pitch Softball Tournament. Begun in 1947, it’s the oldest tournament of its kind. Every summer for more than 65 years, it has brought together teams from all over the country in a celebration of athleticism and Mexican-American heritage, Lewandowski writes:

“It’s basically pride; everybody down there is Mexican-American,” [Angels pitcher Louis] Vaca says. “You’re playing for pride amongst your peers.”

With mariachi bands and dances, the atmosphere at the tournament is welcoming and family-friendly, but that doesn’t mean that the players don’t take the game seriously. A good number of participants played college ball, and some competed in baseball’s minor leagues.

One local team, the Angels, even won the 2009 North American Fast-Pitch Association national championship—the first Mexican-American team to do so.

It’s just one more example of how Mexican-Americans in Newton continue to use the game they love as a way to foster a shared community with a strong sense of history.

Dr. Rachel Epp Buller, Hometown Teams Partner Site Project Director for North Newton’s Bethel College, said she hopes this exhibit will emphasize how sports help connect all kinds of communities. It’s something she sees with her students, as well.

“Sports provide that link, that team experience, to help make the foreign familiar….a link to community integration—historically and in the world today,” Buller added.

The Root for the Home Team: Building Community Through Sports exhibition will be on display at Bethel College beginning September 1, 2015 as part of the Hometown Teams in Kansas initiative.  Click here for more information or visit KHC’s Calendar of Events.

Humanities Happenings — 02/06 – 02/08

The humanities are the talk of several Kansas towns this weekend. Read on to find a KHC-sponsored event near you.

Topeka: Drift and Drag                                                                                            

The public is invited to the opening of “Drift & Drag: Reflections on Water,” a special exhibit that examines Kansans’ perceptions of and experience with water. The reception will feature a dance performance by Ellie Goudie-Averill entitled “Ladies of the Lake.” February 6 at 5:30pm at Washburn University, Mulvane Art Museum. Click here for details.

 

Lorraine Madway

Lorraine Madway

Derby: Life on the Homefront 

When the United States entered World War I in the spring of 1917, the civilian population was aware of the high casualty rates from trench warfare and the resulting low morale. It was necessary to inspire and inform people in ways that were both heroic and practical. This presentation will highlight posters, pamphlets, and sheet music that encouraged Americans to buy Liberty Bonds; raise, conserve, and send food to Europe; and promote the importance of books and libraries as a vital component of democracy. February 7 at 2:00pm at Derby Public Library. Click here for details.

 

 

 

Angela O. Bates

Angela O. BatesGreensburg: Journey to Freedom

Greensburg: Journey to Freedom

Before homesteading as free men in the African American settlement of Nicodemus, Kansas, Tom Johnson and John Samuels were enslaved by U.S. Vice President Richard M. Johnson (1837-1841) and his daughter Imogene Pence. Johnson became a controversial figure when he married Julia Chinn, a biracial woman and mother of his two daughters. This presentation follows Tom and John’s journey from enslavement in Kentucky to freedom experienced in an all-Black town. Learn about their lives on the Johnson plantation, the tragic split of their families, and their migration and settlement at historic Nicodemus. February 7 at 2:00pm at Kiowa County Senior Center. Click here for details.            Hometown Teams_Title Treatment_color_FNL

Lyons: Rice County’s “Hometown Teams”

The public is invited to the opening of “Hometown Teams in Rice County,” an special exhibit that features stories of local sports heritage from Geneseo, Chase, Little River, Sterling, and Lyons.

The project is part of “Hometown Teams,” a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities. February 8 at 2:00pm at Rice County Historical Society. Click here for details.

John K. Burchill

John K. Burchill

Larned: Patrolling the Prairie

Kansas was once the center of operations for many organized bands of horse thieves. In reaction, many independent anti-horse thief societies were formed, with the national Anti-Horse Thief Association especially strong in Kansas. By 1910 Kansas held the most members, was home to The Anti-Horse Thief Weekly News, and consistently had residents hold offices in the national order. So effective were these organizations that local law enforcement were often the first to join, and the Kansas Bank Commissioner called for their assistance to help fight bank robberies that plagued the state. February 8 at 2:00pm at Santa Fe Trail Center. Click here for details.

 

 

Leo Oliva

Leo Oliva

Kinsley: Out of the Dust

Fort Hays State University history professor Leo Oliva discusses “Letters from the Dust Bowl,” a collection of writings authored Caroline Henderson in the heart of Dust Bowl in the 1930s. Her work was regularly published in the Atlantic Monthly magazine. Documentary filmmaker Ken Burns used Henderson’s letters in his 2012 film “The Dust Bowl.”

Guest musician Thad Beach will provide songs and stories that explore the Dust Bowl era, including seven songs inspired interviews with Western Kansas Dust Bowl survivors.

This event is part of a series of reading discussions that support the exhibit “Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry.” February 8 at 2:00pm at Kinsley Public Library. Click here for details.

 

Michael J. Zogry

Michael J. Zogry

Ellinwood: Father Basketball

“Hometown Teams” Tour Scholar Michael J. Zogry examines the influence of James Naismith’s religious beliefs on his life, including the creation of basketball, and on the commemoration of his legacy. February 8 at 1:30pm at Ellinwood School and Community Library. Click here for details.

 

 

North Newton: Race in America

Each year, twelve percent of drivers in the United States are stopped by the police; the figure is almost double among racial minorities. Charles Epp, professor of public administration at the University of Kansas, will explore what personal narratives tell us about the experience of being stopped.

This event supports “Sorting Out Race,” a special exhibit that uses thrift store race-related objects as a starting point for conversations about race and racial identify. February 8 at 3:00pm at Kauffman MuseumClick here for details.

Click here to mark your calendars for Humanities Happenings later this month.

 

 

 

 

For the Love of the Game

This year, KHC features weekly posts related to the Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition Hometown Teams, currently touring Kansas.

University of Kansas alum Lynette Woodard broke barriers for women in basketball, even becoming the first woman on the Harlem Globetrotters.  Photo courtesy Kansas Athletics, Inc.

University of Kansas player Lynette Woodard broke barriers for women in basketball, even becoming the first woman on the Harlem Globetrotters. Photo courtesy Kansas Athletics, Inc.

Professional sports are often thought of as a young person’s game.

There’s a lot of truth to that idea: the average age of players on NFL, NHL, MLB and NBA teams seems to be somewhere in the mid- to late 20s. It’s harder to find statistics for women’s professional sports, but for WNBA players, at least, this study also puts average age in the mid-20s.

And then there’s Wichita native Lynette Woodard, whose WNBA career began at the age of 38.

Not just anyone could have done it, but then, Woodard isn’t just anyone. She’s one of the most dedicated and talented players of all time.

Her love for the game started early, when her older brother taught her how to shoot using a stuffed sock. After leading her high school team to a state championship, she enrolled at the University of Kansas in 1977. In four seasons and 139 games with the Lady Jayhawks, Woodard put up 3,649 points—a record that still stands today.

After graduating from KU in 1981, Woodard followed her love of the game around the world. Whenever and wherever she got the chance to play, there she would go: to European and Japanese professional leagues throughout the 1980s and early 1990s; to the 1984 Olympic games, where she captained the U.S. women’s team and won a gold medal; even to the Harlem Globetrotters, with whom she spent two years—the first woman ever to join the team.

But her dream was to play professional women’s basketball in her home country, so when the WNBA formed in 1996, Woodard found herself suiting up once again. She played two seasons, one with the Cleveland Rockers and one with the Detroit Shock, before retiring from the league just shy of her fortieth birthday.

Woodard made reference to the length of her career in her 2005 Basketball Hall of Fame Enshrinement Speech, thanking the WNBA leaders “for giving the older players a chance to come back to the league.”

“Although it came at the end of my career,” she added, “it was just great to have the opportunity to play in that league.”