Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11 Script Takes to Twitter

As a follow-up to the successful Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater project, Kansas Humanities Council plans to share the Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11 script with the Twitterverse. In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Quantrill’s 1863 raid on Lawrence, KHC will post bite-sized excerpts of the Reader’s Theater project script during the month of August. History buffs, native Kansans, and those interested in learning more about this notorious part of history on the Kansas-Missouri border are encouraged to engage in this KHC-led event!

Image via: twitter.com.

Image via: twitter.com.

Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11 is a compilation of primary sources that range from letters and witness accounts to historical and contemporary newspaper articles. Historians from Kansas and Missouri have reviewed the primary source material, script, and citations to ensure accuracy. The Shared Stories of the Civil War project is a partnership between Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area and the Kansas Humanities Council.

The Kansas Humanities Council is excited to share the story of Quantrill’s Raid and Order Number 11 through Twitter and a corresponding blog post series. From August 1 to the anniversary of Quantrill’s Raid on August 21, @kshumanities will share chronological excerpts of the script.  A short teaser will appear along with links to the full text of that day’s excerpt. Twitter followers can click on the short link to read the entirety of the day’s script and access source citations on KHC’s blog. Watch the events of Quantrill’s raid unfold and digest a daily dose of Kansas history!

Each tweet will be posted with the Twitter handle #QR1863. Use this hashtag to comment, retweet, and share this rich piece of Civil War history with friends and the rest of the Twitterverse! Be sure to follow @kshumanities for updates about this project and click here to read the blog posts!

 

Take Action! A 49% Cut is Too Much for Kansas.

KHC needs your help today to protect funding for the Kansas Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

On Wednesday morning, July 31, the House Appropriations Committee will vote on the bill that proposes a 49% cut to the National Endowment for the Humanities. Having access to, and resources for, local cultural programs is important for healthy communities.

Now is not the time to do 49% less; now is the time to do moreMore local projects that document the stories of changing Kansas, like the shutdown of Treece; more oral histories with Korean War veterans; more citizen discussions on our global and economic competitors, like China; more presentations about topics that inspire us to do more and do better: a history of civil rights in Kansas, contemporary Kansas entrepreneurs, or the work ethic of President Eisenhower.

If you agree, please click here to contact your representative and ask him or her to oppose the 49% cut. Kansas Congressman Kevin Yoder is on the Appropriations Committee, a key national leadership position.

Follow #humanitiesmatter on Twitter for updates and contact Julie Mulvihill at julie(at)kansashumanities.org with questions.

Turning Points Stories of Change

The Turning Points: Stories of Change short film initiative application deadline is July 31st. Click here for more information.

 

Lexington, MO: October 14-19, 1864

In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Price’s raid on Missouri and Kansas, KHC is featuring excerpts from “Price’s March of 1864” Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater script. The Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater project is a partnership between KHC and the Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area.                                                                                                  

Joseph O. Shelby

Photo via: www.usmarshals.gov.

NARRATOR: On October 14, Price’s army overwhelmed the town of Lexington, Missouri, forcing the town to surrender.

READER 2: The city of Lexington, having this day surrendered to me by the Mayor thereof, in the name of the Confederate Government, I have the honor to issue the following General Order:

The rights of non-combatants and private property must be respected and preserved…All public property belonging to the Federal Government in this city is taken possession of, in the name of the Confederacy…All male white citizens between the ages of seventeen and fifty are ordered to report to headquarters at the Court House, within twenty-four hours…If any shots are fired from houses in the city upon Confederate troops, or any force under my command, such houses are ordered to be burned to the ground…This order to be rigidly enforced.

General Joseph Shelby, Confederate Army of the Missouri.

READER 4: I dashed with my command into the town on the morning of the 17th, a little after sunrise…I found but very few citizens in the streets, and they all women and children; but as soon as they learned that “Feds” occupied the town, what few male citizens there were left commenced crawling out of their holes, and the citizens generally commenced crowding around us — some in tears, some in smiles, and some in rags.  They generally appeared much rejoiced at our arrival, and offered us the hospitalities of the town, inviting us to their homes, and acting as if they could not do too much for us.

The citizens of Lexington have had a reign of terror, both loyal people…and rebels.  The enemy have plundered and robbed indiscriminately, taking everything of value they could carry away, and have left many poor families very destitute.

Major J. Nelson Smith, Union army.

Will Price’s army cross the border into Kansas? Check back on October 21 for the answer.

READER 3: Between 3,000 and 4,000 Federals (Colorado, Kansas, and Missouri Federal troops), were at Lexington…The advance, under Shelby, met them about 2 p.m., and a battle immediately ensued.  For a time the Federals fought well and resisted strenuously, but finally giving way, they were pressed by our troops, driven well past Lexington, and pursued on the road to Independence until night put an end to the combat.  That night the enemy evacuated Lexington in great haste and confusion.

General Sterling Price, Confederate Army of the Missouri.

READER 5: It was now evident that Price’s entire army was moving westward, aiming directly at Kansas.

Captain Richard Hinton, Kansas, Army of the Border.

Will General Price cross in to Kansas territory? Find out on October 21st!

Battles of Glasgow and Sedalia, MO: October 15, 1864

In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Price’s raid on Missouri and Kansas, KHC is featuring excerpts from “Price’s March of 1864” Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater script. The Shared Stories of the Civil War reader’s theater project is a partnership between KHC and the Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area.                                                                                                  

Richard Josiah Hinton

Richard Josiah Hinton. Photo courtesy of: kansasmemory.org, Kansas State Historical Society. Copy and Reuse Restrictions apply.

READER 5: [A] bold dash of [rebel] General Shelby across the Missouri river at Arrow Rock, with his capture of Glasgow and three regiments of Missouri and Illinois troops…aroused the border from its quiet sense of security.  The rapidity of Price’s advance, with his avoiding rather than accepting conflict with the Union forces, was evidence that his expedition was not a military campaign, but a predatory raid, that had in it more terror than the deliberate clash of hostile armies.

Shalor Winchell Eldridge, Kansas militia.

READER 3: I sent…orders to…attack the town [of Glasgow] from the west side of the river…The place was surrendered, but not until after the City Hall was destroyed and the arms consumed by fire.  By the capture of this place, however, we obtained between 800 or 900 prisoners, about 1,200 small arms, about the same number of overcoats, 150 horses, 1 steamboat, and large amounts of underclothing.

The captured prisoners were paroled, such of the ordnance and other stores captured as could not be carried were distributed, and the remaining portion, together with the steamboat, burned.

General Sterling Price, Confederate Army of the Missouri.

READER 1: Words fail in painting the gloomy uncertainty.  Over the thousands of homes, from each of which some loved one had gone forth at the call of duty, hung sadness and fearful anxiety.  But, impressed by the urgency, one common purpose now animated old and young…Each man felt he was defending his own fireside.

Captain Richard Hinton, Kansas, Army of the Border.

How would you defend your hearth and home if enemy forces invaded your community? Tune in on October 19 for the next blog post!

Turning Points: Community

 

KHC’s special initiative, Turning Points: Stories of Change, invites museums, public libraries, and other nonprofit cultural and civic groups to tell their community’s pivotal moment in history as a five-minute short film. The project is supported by a generous gift from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

What is a Turning Point? Think of it as an idea, event, action, or moment in time that directly or indirectly caused decisive change in your community. This change can be social, cultural, or economic, but it ultimately, and significantly, affected your community’s way of thinking or doing.

Here are some topics and videos to use as inspiration for your Turning Points application. Note: inclusion of video or articles in this post is not an endorsement.

Community

All Turning Points: Stories of Change projects relate to community, but this topic category looks at turning points that impact the community fabric and way of life. Turning points can take communities in new directions, reconnect residents with the past in new ways, and help citizens chart a course for the future. Ideas for Community Turning Points include:

Uniting & Rebuilding

When disaster strikes, many communities come together to unite and rebuild. While a disaster in and of itself is a turning point, it can also be a catalyst for community change for the positive: community teamwork, new partnerships, new construction, and a change in perspective. How has your community’s response to a disaster been a positive turning point for your community?

Ideas to consider:

Read about a Wisconsin community’s rebuilding efforts after a devastating flood. [Baraboo News Republic]

Heritage & Culture

Preserving the Past: Topeka’s Jayhawk Theatre (FLIKS Version) from WonderCat Productions on Vimeo.

Many communities find that investing in heritage and culture is an important turning point for their community. Restoration of an historic building or districts, establishment of historical museums or arts centers, or other investments that promote engagement with history and culture can create positive ripple effects in a community. Has a heritage or cultural project been a turning point for your community?

Ideas to consider:

Watch a story about a North Carolina community’s historic preservation success story. [UNC TV]

New Beginnings

A monumental event can completely change the course of a community and send it in a new direction. The most famous example in Kansas is the 2007 tornado in Greensburg and the town’s new life as a green, sustainable community. But, it’s not just tornados, floods, or fires that prompt new beginnings. What turning points have sent your community on a new path or created a new vision for the future?

Ideas to consider:

Watch a story about Greensburg’s use of green standards to rebuild after the 2007 tornado. [USA Today]

It’s Local!

A renewed interest in slow food and support of local agriculture has impacted the way communities grow, purchase, and eat their food. Farmers markets, food hubs, community gardens, farm tours, and urban farms bring people together and impact local farms, businesses, community health, and tourism. Has your community experienced a turning point related to community agriculture?

Ideas to consider:

Read about food hubs in Iowa. [Iowa Public Radio]

Watch a story about the urban farming movement. [New York Times]

The deadline for Turning Points: Stories of Change applications is July 31, 2013. Click here for application and eligibility requirements. Contact Leslie Von Holten, program officer, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359 for more information.

Humanities Happenings (7/20-7/30)

Beat the heat with KHC-supported events taking place through the end of July. Talk about books in Ashland, ponder postcards in Tonganoxie, and put on your cowboy hats in Abilene.

Ashland: TALK of the Town

Where do book lovers gather to share insights, ideas, and good books? At TALK discussions, of course! Join Dennis Etzel as he leads a Talk About Literature in Kansas (TALK) book discussion of Winter Wheat by Mildred Walker at Ashland Library. July 20th at noon. Click here for details. Not sure what to expect at a TALK discussion? Watch this short film to learn more!

Talk about Literature in Kansas from Gizmo Pictures on Vimeo.

Tall Tale Exaggerated Postcard

Tonganoxie: Tall Tales

Ever wonder about exaggerated postcards? You know the ones: giant grasshoppers that stop trains in their tracks or ears of corn so big that it takes a saw to cut them in half? Join Erika Nelson as she profiles the creativity of postcard pioneers in “The Tall-Tale Postcards of Dad Martin and Pop Conard” at the Tonganoxie Community Historical Society. See postcard examples and learn how you can make your own “hopper whopper.” July 23 at 7:00 PM. Click here for details.
Image courtesy of KansasMemory, Kansas Historical Society.

Jim Hoy

Jim Hoy

Abilene: Cattle Boom

Satisfy your inner cowboy or cowgirl with two Speakers Bureau presentations on Kansas cattle history, July 27th at Old Abilene Town. At 10 AM, join Jim Gray as he presents “Frontier Cattle Towns.” Find out what happened when cowboys, cattle buyers, salon keepers, madams, merchants, and settlers came together, and how the relationships formed a national industry. Click here for details.

At 12:30 PM, Jim Hoy explains why cowboy folksongs were more than entertainment on the lonely prairie and how cattle drovers created a musical culture that still appeals to today’s ranchers in “Singing the Cattle North.” Click here for details.

And there’s much more happening throughout the summer. Click here for a full schedule of KHC-sponsored events.

Turning Points: Business

KHC’s special initiative, Turning Points: Stories of Change, invites museums, public libraries, and other nonprofit cultural and civic groups to tell their community’s pivotal moment in history as a five-minute short film. The project is supported by a generous gift from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

What is a Turning Point? Think of it as an idea, event, action, or moment in time that directly or indirectly caused decisive change in your community. This change can be social, cultural, or economic, but it ultimately, and significantly, affected your community’s way of thinking or doing.

Here are some topics and videos to use as inspiration for your Turning Points application. Note: inclusion of video or articles in this post is not an endorsement.

Business

Businesses shape and energize our communities. Whether it’s a new business venture or a community’s response to the loss of a factory or grocery store, businesses drive many of our community turning points.

Saving Local Businesses

Across America, small towns and urban neighborhoods have developed innovative ways to deal with the loss of community grocery stores, movie theaters, and other vital businesses. Is your town or neighborhood one of them? How has your community’s response to the loss of a local business been a turning point?
Video via America’s Heartland.

Ideas to consider:

Read about the impact of a new grocery store in Kansas City neighborhood. [Kansas City Business Journal]

Entrepreneurs

Has an entrepreneur put your community on the map? Whether it’s a shop, factory, restaurant, or technology firm, a local entrepreneur’s success story can be a community turning point.

Ideas to consider:

Read the story of a quilter whose Missouri shop has a global following. [Kansas City Star]

Read about high-end furniture manufacturers, Dessin Fournir Companies of Plainville, KS. [Get Rural Kansas]

Listen as Ron Wilson shares stories of Kansas entrepreneurs on Kansas Profile. [Kansas Profile/K-State]

Giving Back

Local businesses give back their communities in numerous and innovative ways. Whether it’s supporting a local food bank, donating funds to a local institution, or volunteering, the example set by local businesses inspires others to follow their lead. Has a local business’s spirit of giving been a turning point for your community?
Video via CNS Maryland.

Ideas to consider:

Read about Excel Industries and their legacy of giving in Hesston. [Hesston College]

The deadline for Turning Points: Stories of Change applications is July 31, 2013. Click here for application and eligibility requirements. Contact Leslie Von Holten, program officer, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359 for more information.

Turning Points: Technology

KHC’s special initiative, Turning Points: Stories of Change, invites museums, public libraries, and other nonprofit cultural and civic groups to tell their community’s pivotal moment in history as a five-minute short film. The project is supported by a generous gift from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

What is a Turning Point? Think of it as an idea, event, action, or moment in time that directly or indirectly caused decisive change in your community. This change can be social, cultural, or economic, but it ultimately, and significantly, affected your community’s way of thinking or doing.

Here are some topics and videos to use as inspiration for your Turning Points application. Note: inclusion of video or articles in this post is not an endorsement.

Technology

From the computers at our homes and businesses to the smart phones in our pockets to the ATMs at the local bank or supermarket, technology impacts every facet of our lives. Technology marks a definite turning point between “before” and “after,” but technology can also impact a community through job opportunities, access to the wider world, and by changing the ways we live and work. Ideas for Technology Turning Points include:

 

Access

Much of modern life is lived online and computers, smart phones, and iPads are our gateway to the online world. Technology — and access to technology — can be a turning point for communities. Has increased access to technology, through faster internet speed or computers at the library, been a turning point for your community?
Video via NBC News.

Ideas to consider:

Read about how one-third of Americans use public library computers, according to a study from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [NBC News]

Work on the Farm & in the City

Whether you live and work in a rural area, the suburbs, or a city, technology plays a big role in your life. For farmers, technology has changed the way farmers do their job. In cities, access to high speed internet has attracted technology startups. How has technology been a turning point for your community’s workers?

Ideas to consider:

Listen to a podcast about technology innovations and farming in Goodland. [High Plains Museum]

Read about the startups springing up in the Kansas City area because of Google Fiber. [Huffington Post]

Entrepreneurs

Technology innovators can be found in cities, small towns, and rural areas. Their success can be a turning point for a community economically and socially. Has a technology entrepreneur’s business success been a turning point for your community? Has an entrepreneur’s innovations created a technology turning point for your community?

Ideas to consider:

Read about a technology entrepreneur with roots in rural Iowa. [Silicon Prairie News]

The deadline for Turning Points: Stories of Change applications is July 31, 2013. Click here for application and eligibility requirements. Contact Leslie Von Holten, program officer, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359 for more information.

Turning Points: People

 

KHC’s special initiative, Turning Points: Stories of Change, invites museums, public libraries, and other nonprofit cultural and civic groups to tell their community’s pivotal moment in history as a five-minute short film. The project is supported by a generous gift from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

What is a Turning Point? Think of it as an idea, event, action, or moment in time that directly or indirectly caused decisive change in your community. This change can be social, cultural, or economic, but it ultimately, and significantly, affected your community’s way of thinking or doing.

Here are some topics and videos to use as inspiration for your Turning Points application. Note: inclusion of video or articles in this post is not an endorsement.

People

Turning points need people. It’s as simple as that. Community visionaries, groundbreakers, and volunteers make change happen. Who are the agents of change who have brought about Turning Points in your community? Some ideas about Turning Points and People include:

Groundbreakers

 

Every community has it’s “firsts”: the first female city council member, the first doctor, the first integrated students, and the list goes on. For many communities, these groundbreakers bring new ideas and serve as catalysts for change in a community. How has a community groundbreaker influenced a turning point in your community?
Video via KSHB.

Other ideas to consider:

Watch the Mariachi Estrella short film about the first all-female mariachi band.

Visionaries

These are the civic leaders, the town boosters, educators, library directors, museum professionals, and business people who make things happen in our community. They see what our community could be and work to make that happen. How have your community visionaries brought about a turning point in your community?

Other ideas to consider:

Watch the Bauer, Baker, and Baldwin City short film about one man’s vision for electrifying a small town.

Watch Uncommon Ground, a short film about one woman’s vision to revive the Bartlett Arboretum in Belle Plaine.

Kan-Doers

They are the people in your community who are always there to help. They are the ones who organize community events, care for the sick, man the volunteer fire department, and keep the community spirit alive. Has a volunteer force in your community been responsible for a turning point?

Read about volunteers whose work is keeping small town theaters alive. [New York Times]

Listen to a podcast about the Goodfellows, a volunteer group in Rice County. [Coronado-Quivira Museum]

Read about volunteers who worked to restore a cemetery in Iowa. [Daily Yonder]

The deadline for Turning Points: Stories of Change applications is July 31, 2013. Click here for application and eligibility requirements. Contact Leslie Von Holten, program officer, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359 for more information.

Turning Points: Tourism

KHC’s special initiative, Turning Points: Stories of Change, invites museums, public libraries, and other nonprofit cultural and civic groups to tell their community’s pivotal moment in history as a five-minute short film. The project is supported by a generous gift from Suzi Miner in memory of Kansas historian Craig Miner.

What is a Turning Point? Think of it as an idea, event, action, or moment in time that directly or indirectly caused decisive change in your community. This change can be social, cultural, or economic, but it ultimately, and significantly, affected your community’s way of thinking or doing.

Here are some topics and videos to use as inspiration for your Turning Points application. Note: inclusion of video or articles in this post is not an endorsement.

Tourism

Landmarks, festivals, museums, and one-of-a-kind attractions bring tourists to our communities from near and far. Think of a Tourism Turning Points short film in terms of how tourism transformed your community, rather than a film promoting tourism in your community. Some ideas for Tourism Turning Points include:

Festivals & Celebrations

Community festivals connect us to community heritage and unite us around a common culture, local custom, or point of community pride. Has your community’s festival become a source of tourism? Has it united your community? How has a community festival or celebration become a turning point?

Listen to Ron Wilson’s story of Paxico’s Meatloaf Festival. [Kansas Profile/K-State]

Watch a story about Topeka’s Fiesta Mexicana, now in it’s 80th year.[WIBW]

Watch highlights from the 2011 Czech Fest in Wilson. [scottosonic/YouTube]

Watch a story about the colorful Coal Buckets in downtown Pittsburg, part of the Southeast Kansas Arts Fest. [Fourstates]

Off the Beaten Path

Roadside attractions are unique and memorable monuments to creativity and ingenuity. A roadside attraction’s popularity can be a turning point for a community, bringing more tourists and revitalizing downtowns. Has a roadside attraction been a turning point for your community?
Video via World’s Largest Things.

Other ideas to consider:

Click here to read about Cawker City’s Ball of Twine. [Roadside America]

Working Together

Region by region and across the state, communities have worked together to promote one another. Has your community experienced revitalization or increased tourism because of cooperative marketing?
Video: 8 Wonders of Kansas Guidebook reception, via Kansas Sampler.

Other ideas to consider:

Watch the “A Drive Through History along the Post Rock Scenic Byway” short film.

The deadline for Turning Points: Stories of Change applications is July 31, 2013. Click here for application and eligibility requirements. Contact Leslie Von Holten, program officer, at leslie(at)kansashumanities.org or (785) 357-0359 for more information.